Donne and W; T Speech

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“John Donne’s poetry stands alone.. But W;t is nothing without it’s connection to Donne”.. Good morning teachers and students, today I will be speaking about the connections between the poetry of the metaphysical poet John Donne, and the play wit, by American playwright Margaret Edson. To say that w;t is nothing without its connection to Donne shows the fact that Donne’s poetry had a major influence into the workings of Edson’s play. W;t is nothing without it’s connection to Donne? Why wouldn’t you agree with this? The evident links between the two prove that w;t could come across as almost meaningless without its connection to Donne’s poetry. Donne’s poetry attempt to answer the mere impossible questions of life, death and love in eccentric and unexpected chains of reasoning, his complex figure of speech, elaborate imagery and bizarre metaphors creates a sense of vibrancy for the reader as they become enthralled in the emotions and meanings behind his poems. His work suggests a healthy appetite for life and its pleasures, while also expressing deep emotion. He did this through the use of conceits, wit and intellect – as seen in the poems “Hymn to God my God” and “Death Be Not Proud”. The questions of life, death and love shown in Donne’s poetry are also then expressed again through W;t as Vivian recounts and expresses her feelings during her time of sickness. Wit re-embodies Donne’s experiences of agony and self evaluation, thereby revitalising the feelings expressed and felt by Vivian The theme of Death is a common connection between both hymn to god, and death be not proud, and the story w;t. In w;t, Vivian quotes Donne’s sonnet death be not proud saying “And Death shall be no more, comma, Death thou shalt die”, as she focuses on the use of the comma in this statement demonstrating Vivian’s view of death, when she explains “death is no longer something to act out on a stage, its a comma.. a pause”. Though also In the last two lines of Donne’s poem, death...
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