Dbq 1: Changing Demographics, 1660 – 1775

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Between 1660 and 1775, Great Britain’s North American colonies were affected greatly by race, ethnicity and religion. The first settlers were predominantly racially white, ethnically, English, and religiously Protestant. The New World was home to many people who sought religious freedom. In addition, the demand of new market and new forces of labor created an opportunity for new races and ethnicities to colonize America. New forces of race, ethnicity and religion show how colonial society was a melting pot compared to any other country in the world. After Queen Elizabeth won the struggle for religious dominance against the Roman Catholics, Protestantism became the main religion in England. To escape persecution, Roman Catholics immigrated to the New World. A wealthy English Catholic, Cecilius Calvert, also known as Lord Baltimore, had set out to create refuge for his fellow Catholics and thus, founded Maryland. However, Catholics were not safe from the Protestant immigrants. In 1649, the Act Concerning Religion was passed by the Maryland colony. This act states that no one that believes in Jesus Christ shall be in any way troubled or disliked for or in respect to his religion, nor should they be compelled to the belief or exercise of any other religion against their consent. This is reiterated in Document A. The coexistence of Protestants and Catholics show how religion has contributed to colonial society. When Englishmen arrived in America, Native Indians were already in control of most of the New World’s lands. The Englishmen saw Indians as pests who stood in their way of colonization. After the English arrived at Chesapeake Bay, violence quickly broke out. Compromising had no effect on the English and Indians. Lord de la Warr launched a vicious campaign, intending to wipe the Indians off the map. All in all, European colonization disrupted Native American life and transformed its culture. As time went by, however, Native Americans were getting better at...
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