Cust Satisfaction- Idea Cellular

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  • Topic: Mobile phone, GSM, Customer satisfaction
  • Pages : 38 (10026 words )
  • Download(s) : 869
  • Published : December 12, 2012
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INDEX
CHAPTER -1
* INTRODUCTION
* CUSTOMER SATISFACTION MEASUREMENT
* METHODLOGIES
* IMPROVING CUSTOMER SATISFACTION
* CUSTOMER SATISFACTION SURVEYS
* BENEFITS AND CHALLENGES
CHAPTER -2
* RESEARCH METHODLOGY
* METHODS OF RESEARCH
* NEEDS OF THE STUDY
* OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY
* LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY
CHAPTER -3
* INDUSTRY PROFILE
* COMPANY PROFILE
* PRODUCT PROFILE
CHAPTER -4
* DATA ANALYSIS
* INTERPRETATION
CHAPTER -5
* FINDINGS & SUGEESTIONS

* BIBLOGRAPHY
* QUESTIONNAIRE

INTRODUCTION
Why Organizations Focus on Customer Satisfaction
Businesses monitor customer satisfaction in order to determine how to increase their customer base, customer loyalty, revenue, profits, market share and survival. Although greater profit is the primary driver, exemplary businesses focus on the customer and his/her experience with the organization. They work to make their customers happy and see customer satisfaction as the key to survival and profit. Customer satisfaction in turn hinges on the quality and effects of their experiences and the goods or services they receive. Customer Satisfaction

      The definition of customer satisfaction has been widely debated as organizations increasingly attempt to measure it. Customer satisfaction can be experienced in a variety of situations and connected to both goods and services. It is a highly personal assessment that is greatly affected by customer expectations. Satisfaction also is based on the customer’s experience of both contact with the organization (the “moment of truth” as it is called in business literature) and personal outcomes. Some researchers define a satisfied customer within the private sector as “one who receives significant added value” to his/her bottom line—a definition that may apply just as well to public services. Customer satisfaction differs depending on the situation and the product or service. A customer may be satisfied with a product or service, an experience, a purchase decision, a salesperson, store, service provider, or an attribute or any of these. Some researchers completely avoid “satisfaction” as a measurement objective because it is “too fuzzy an idea to serve as a meaningful benchmark.”4 Instead, they focus on the customer’s entire experience with an organization or service contact and the detailed assessment of that experience. For example, reporting methods developed for health care patient surveys often ask customers to rate their providers and experiences in response to detailed questions such as, “How well did your physicians keep you informed?” These surveys provide “actionable” data that reveal obvious steps for improvement. Customer satisfaction is a highly personal assessment that is greatly influenced by individual expectations

Some definitions are based on the observation that customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction results from either the confirmation or disconfirmation of individual expectations regarding a service or product. To avoid difficulties stemming from the kaleidoscope of customer expectations and differences, some experts urge companies to “concentrate on a goal that’s more closely linked to customer equity.” Instead of asking whether customers are satisfied, they encourage companies to determine how customers hold them accountable Customer satisfaction, a business term, is a measure of how products and services supplied by a company meet or surpass customer expectation. It is seen as a key performance indicator within business       Customer satisfaction depends on the product’s performance relative to a buyer’s expectation, the customer is dissatisfied.  If preference matches expectations, the customer is satisfied.  If preference is exceeds expectation, the customer is highly satisfied or delighted outstanding marketing insurance companies...
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