Cultures of Uzbekistan and Georgia

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Contents

Introduction2
The insights of Georgian culture3
Wine Production in Georgia5
Cultural Analysis7
Hofstede’s Cultural Dimensions7
Hall’s Context Dimension9
Laurent10
Uzbek Culture11
Wine Production in Uzbekistan12
Cultural Analysis13
Hofstede’s Cultural Dimensions13
Hall’s Context Dimension15
Laurent15
Conclusion16
Recommendation17
Bibliography18
Appendix23

Introduction

Culture is perceived to be one of the difficult words to define and anthropologist Margaret Mead termed culture as being ‘shared patterns of behavior’ (Schneider S. C., and Barsoux J., 2003, 2nd ed., pg21). Culture is also defined by language, religion, beliefs, customs, cuisine, dress code, literature, music etc., and is known to act as a strong bond that attaches the people in a group or community, which can impact the lifestyle and give a unique identity to the community (buzzle.com). The culture in the organization is influential in terms of determining policy, punctuality, the structure, style, etc., within the company. However, the rapid growth of business globally and cultural diversity in the companies, has enabled the organizations to experience different management styles instead of being limited to the domestic borders of management (philodialogue.com).

The insights of Georgian culture

Believed Legend. A divine country – this is how Georgia is known according to the ancient folk legend. The Georgians believe that when God was dividing the land amongst the nations, the Georgians came in late because they were busy drinking and eating, therefore, were left with nothing. However, they were acute enough to say that they drunk for his health and invited him to join them in this feast. The legend goes on claiming that God enjoyed the feast to the extend that he awarded them with the best piece of land that he had actually put aside for himself (saga.ua). Nowadays, Georgians perceive their culture as being part of European society, however, it should be mentioned that, in spite of this gravitation towards Europe, Persian and Turkish cultures had always influenced Georgia throughout its existence (http://works.tarefer.ru). The Georgians prefer to call themselves Kartvelebi after the pagan god Kartlos who is as they believe the father of all the Georgians (angelfire.com).

Customs and its Society. Georgia is full of various customs, some which can be identical to other cultures and some which are unique to Georgia itself, below are examples (kwintessential.co.uk) of few customs and etiquettes that Georgians get engaged in during their everyday life as was told by Nikas Goderzishvili during an interview. For example, Georgians are known to be very welcoming and sociable people, in fact a “warm hospitality is a Georgian trait”. Guests are highly respected and are considered as a gift; therefore, any guests including foreigners are always welcomed and are invited to have a meal, since hospitality and festivity are the main aspects and cornerstone of their culture. Another custom is shaking hands and greeting each other if met for the first time, and only after getting closely acquainted and developing warm relationship, Georgians kiss on the cheek and publicly embrace when greeting each other. In addition, bringing gifts like chocolate set or some kind of sweets, or even buying tiny gifts for young children of the host house, is considered as a polite behavior and is appreciated. When it comes to dining etiquette, the meal is started by the eldest and one should expect the table to be full of different helpings and dishes, accompanied by warm and active conversation. Moreover, when given gifts, it is usually expected that they are to be unwrapped later compared to other cultures, like in

Cypriot one, where presents are to be opened immediately because otherwise the guest would believe that the gift was not appreciated (personal experience).

Business Etiquette. Customs and...
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