Cultural Safety

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Cultural Safety Principles Assignment
BNKH501
Z Group
2010001919
29/03/12
Monigue Dalziel
1610 words

Garrod, A. (2002). Cultural safety: Living with a disability. Whitireia Nursing Journal, 9, 14-19. Every unique person living with a disability is part of a wider disability culture. This culture shares their experiences, values, beliefs and their general ways of life. Within a population, the disability culture has minimal power due to being the minority. Annette Garrod reminds us about the significance of reflecting on your beliefs and attitudes when caring for patients with disabilities. This would allow the patient to partake in decision making about their care and as a result the patients physical, mental and emotional wellbeing would be upheld. She admits upon reflection, she noticed her lack of confidence and inability to connect with her patients effectively, and was unable to give the patient the right information for them to receive holistic care and support. Empowerment needs to be considered when nursing a patient with a disability. The nurse needs to be able to give the patient support and correspond on their behalf, to help them if they are unable to understand or articulate their requirements and to see the patient as an individual rather than just seeing their disability. When caring for patients with disabilities in a culturally safe manner, positive language, good communication skills, kind advice, support and an encouraging outlook are very important. (205)

Hughes, M., & Farrow, T. (2007). Caring for obese patients in a culturally safe way. Kai Tiaki Nursing New Zealand, 13(4), 14-15. Nursing’s ideas on obesity are constructed by cultures influenced by, the “western” model of a perfect body, the bio-medical model that sees obesity as a disease and thoughts around obese individuals being the sole cause of their condition. Cultural safety needs to be practiced, regardful of difference, when caring for obese clients. Nurses must reflect on their caring to make sure they are not merely replicating the bio-medical model. Different cultures have diverse beliefs towards obesity. These differences could affect the patient/nurse relationship, and the nurse should be aware of their patient’s beliefs about obesity. Nurses also need to be mindful of their own beliefs about obesity to stay away from bringing shame upon their client. Often, obese patients will be judged by health care providers believing their condition was all their own doing, therefore believing they don’t deserve the same health care as a person who ‘looks after themselves’, which in turn can lead to worse health outcomes. Nurse-led clinics may be the answer for people struggling with their weight, as it would be a friendly, non-judgemental and safe environment. Support and growing self-regard is vital for success in their road to recovery. (194)

Kruske, S., Kildea, S., & Barclay, L. (2006). Cultural safety and maternity care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. Women and Birth, 19(3), 73-77. The concept of cultural safety, developed by Mãori nurses in New Zealand, provides a great opportunity to improve the delivery of maternity services to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women of Australia. Rather than teach midwives and nurses about components of different cultures, cultural safety asks the health practitioner to discover their own cultures. With cultural safety in mind, their aims are to be unbiased and non-judgemental. Nurses and midwives belong to a culture of their own. This culture can become very intimidating to the client and leave them feeling powerless and possibly alienate them from the service. They should also be mindful of the amount of confusing medical language they use and even offensive clothing as this could be domineering and isolating. An important thing to remember, the care provider can never assume they have supplied the care in a culturally safe manner, for the...
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