Crm in Fmcg

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Serious About a Relationship?

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> Six Ways to Use C RM Systems to Prepare for Economic Recovery C ustomer Relationship Management: C oping With Budget C uts

Nine Cycles of (Business) Life and C ustomer Relationship Management

Not that either assertion is w rong.

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Do you currently have a CRM system?: If yes, what type is it?: What type of features do you require: Sales Automation Customer Service/Support Marketing Automation Customizable Channel/Partner Management Integration to other systems

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How would you like users to access the CRM?: Through web brow sers With mobile devices Please explain why you are seeking a CRM system and any other requirements you have: Through company netw ork only

Both these latter tw o mantras of Customer Relationship Management, or CRM, are achievable by certain companies in certain circumstances. However, their use as a sweeping generalisation by marketers keen to convince the main board to invest millions in CRM software, is unjustified. On the other hand, while it may have looked as though a majority of CRM projects in 2001 teetered on the brink of failure, this is no longer the case four years later. Recent research from Lloyd James Group[2]indicates a 5-10% drop in available data on the market. And opt-out rates from the Electoral Register (a major prospecting resource for marketers) now stand at 29%[3]. This has occasioned a small but significant shift of marketing investment aw ay from new customer acquisition, and tow ards existing customer development. Research from Pitney Bowes[4]indicates that by the end of this year, 51% of marketing investment w ill go into customer marketing, and 49% into prospect marketing. Another research project from the beginning of 2005 — this time from Group 1 Softw are — showed that an overall majority of top UK companies — 53% - obtain a return on their investment in customer management. We are at a w atershed moment, in that these few statistics indicate that a majority of organisations w ill now be relying on effective CRM to manage customers, revenues and profits. CRM is now working more often than it is…/t6_librarynews_1.php?i…



Serious About a Relationship?

The Research So, after four years where every analyst in sight has poured vilification on the ability of organisations to obtain value from their CRM projects, it seemed time to challenge this scepticism further. One-off technology costs can be w ritten off; ongoing people costs cannot. So a company that puts CRM into the title of one of its senior managers is a brave company indeed nowadays. TotalDM therefore decided to commission research amongst the UK’s top 500 companies (completed May 2005) to find out how many of them had that most expensive of people, a Head of CRM. The study also investigated w hether that CRM Head also had another main job, such as Marketing Director or Customer Services Director. This was felt to add colour to whether the role was being treated as a wholly absorbing directorial function, or w hether it was diluted by combination w ith another discipline. And thirdly, the research also broke the findings down to compare different industry sectors. The penetration of Heads of CRM was felt to be a good proxy for the commitment that these large industry sectors w ere showing, not only to the notion of CRM, but to its successful practice, and its permanence within the organisation. Convincing metrics demonstrating return on investment from CRM strategies and systems are now demanded by colleagues, analysts, markets and shareholders. So if an official and directorial role had been created form CRM, this w as felt to be compelling evidence to an...
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