Crime Examined Through Four Theoretical Perspectives

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Crime Examined through Four theoretical Perspectives
Crime is defined as a breach of rules or laws that have been set by the government. Society has been given a set of rules that everyone who believes in good morals, follow. A crime would be anyone who has broken these set of laws for personal reasons such as greed. As of 2006, the crime rate of Toronto was 1,000 per 100,000. This has as shown a decrease since 2002. Crime has become an entity that is a part of society, without it, society would not function correctly. In the study of sociology, crime can be explained in four theoretical perspectives; Functionalism, conflict, interactionism, and feminism. Functionalism is a theoretical orientation which views society as a system of interdependent parts whose functions contribute to keep society alive and stable. Crime has been a part of society since the beginning and yet we have not done anything drastic to reduce or even remove it because it is needed for society to function normally. Crime has become the somewhat normal in society because of it creates employment opportunities for everyone. Law enforcement, lawyers and judges, security guards all have jobs built around the negativity of crime. People commit crimes for personal reasons such as to support family, themselves, and/or drug addictions. There are endless reasons to why people commit crimes. When a crime has been committed, it disrupts social by changing the normal function of society. The Conflict theory is a perspective that accentuates the social status, political, and discrimination in the social group. Society has a stereotypical view on those who commit a crime. Race and social status has played a large role in this discrimination. Crimes
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