Creating a Successful Employee Value Proposition

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Creating a Successful Employee Value Proposition
Create a clear, compelling and distinctive description of what a position offers candidates and current employees.


Employee Value Proposition
What is an Employee Value Proposition (EVP)?
An Employee Value Proposition (EVP) is a clear, compelling, and distinct description of what candidates and employees will experience from their overall work situation within your organization. This “experience” is made up of the type of work the employee will do, the relationship created with a manager, the work environment the employee will be a part of, and the overall characteristics of the organization. A clear and compelling EVP will create a “story” of what it will really be like to work for the organization, to work for a particular manager, and to perform the outlined job roles and responsibilities.

Employee Value Proposition (EVP) Desired Results
A clear, compelling, distinctive Employee Value Proposition will: • • • • •

Differentiate you from your “employee competitors” Engage existing employees Cause some candidates to increase their effort to be selected during the hiring process Cause some candidates to self-select out of the selection process Lead to a better “fit” between candidates, the position, and the organization

Your Position EVP

Organization Reputation

Current Position Offerings

Recruitment & Selection Messages


Employee Value Proposition
Create a compelling picture of what a position has to offer candidates in four areas: work, work environment, manager actions, and organization characteristics. The Position EVP must “sell” the position’s strengths, as well as “sell” what a candidate is looking for. In addition, it helps strengthen the message communicated during the hiring process to ensure candidates know what to realistically expect.

Process Steps
Use the Retention Cards® to identify a position’s current Strengths, Average Capabilities, and Weaknesses. Instuctions for this process are on page 4 and data can be recorded using the Position EVP Summary Sheet on page 5.

Step 1
Select the EVP variables that are strengths of the position and record them on the EVP Variables Worksheet (page 6) and summarize them in the Position EVP Template (page 7). Remember, focus on the vital few talent variables which capture what you have to offer, and makes your position worthy of great employees.

Now that your Position EVP variables are selected, you must determine how you will communicate the message to others. Using the Position EVP Statement worksheet, practice writing a concise Position EVP using the variables on the Position EVP Template. •

Refer to the clear, compelling, and distinctive criteria as you compose your message. You are “marketing” the value created by the EVP components, you do not want to just “restate” the variables. Remember, the “compelling” part of any Position EVP has to be illustrated by examples, and delivered with passion and energy.

Step 2

Perform an evaluation of your Position EVP by using the Position EVP Evaluator. Continue refining your Position EVP statement until you have a “Winning EVP”.

Step 3

Note: Save the completed Position EVP Summary Sheets to use in interviewing candidates for Organization Fit.


Position EVP
Position EVP Sort Process Instructions
Using the Retention Cards® outline a Position EVP by identifying the position’s current Strengths, Average capabilities, and Weaknesses

Step 1: Open the Retention Cards® and separate the blue cards from the green/red cards. • • • • Shuffle the Retention Cards® Find blue Header Cards (D) A Weakness, (E) Average, and (F) A Strength You may need to flip the blue cards over to find the correct side Place blue cards D, E, and F on your desk or table

Step 2: Read the GREEN side of each card and determine if the variable is a current Strength, Average capability, or Weakness for the position you are...
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