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The Stranger (novel)
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| This article may contain original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding references. Statements consisting only of original research may be removed. (September 2007) |

The Stranger|

1st US version
(publ. Alfred A. Knopf, 1946)[1]|
Author(s)| Albert Camus|
Cover artist| Jack Walser|
Country| France|
Language| French|
Genre(s)| Philosophical novel|
Publisher| Libraire Gallimard|
Publication date| 1943, French 1942|
The Stranger or The Outsider (L’Étranger) is a novel by Albert Camus published in 1942. Its theme and outlook are often cited as exemplars of existentialism, though Camus did not consider himself an existentialist; in fact, its content explores various philosophical schools of thought, including (most prominently and specifically) absurdism, as well as determinism, nihilism, naturalism, and stoicism. The title character is Meursault, an Algerian ("a citizen of France domiciled in North Africa, a man of the Mediterranean, an homme du midi yet one who hardly partakes of the traditional Mediterranean culture")[2] who seemingly irrationally kills an Arab man whom he recognises in French Algiers. The story is divided into two parts: Meursault's first-person narrative view before and after the murder, respectively. Contents * 1 Plot * 2 Characters * 3 Character foils * 4 Philosophy * 5 English translations from the French * 5.1 Translations of the title * 6 In popular culture * 7 Selected film adaptations * 8 See also * 9 References| Plot

Part One begins with Meursault finding out of his mother's death. At her funeral, he expresses none of the expected emotions of grief. When asked if he wishes to view the body, he says no, and, instead, smokes and drinks coffee with milk in front of the coffin. Rather than expressing his feelings, he only comments to the reader about the...