Comparing and Contrasting the Benefits of Public and Private Education.

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Comparing and Contrasting the Benefits of Public and Private Education. When people are looking for the right school for their child, they sometimes consider the many advantages of public schools. Although they do have their own disadvantages, a public school education might still be the right choice for their child. Primarily, a public school education is free. Although sometimes this means the quality of the academic programs are not as high as those of private schools are, this is not always the case. If you check with a realtor in the area where you live or are planning to move to, they can inform you of the standard of the schools in your area. Public schools vary widely in academics and extracurricular programs. Classrooms are usually larger in public schools, meaning that there are more students and less individual attention from teachers. High enrollment rates in public school, however, are not always a bad thing. Students are exposed to more people from differing socio-economic backgrounds. This teaches children how to get along with one another regardless of differences, and can provide a more complete educational experience. In a public school, you will know what to expect in terms of curriculum and philosophy. All public schools adhere to state and federal regulatory standards and the curriculum and grading are standardized. If you prefer that your child's education be secular, public schools do not introduce theological or religious studies into curriculum. Although dropout and violence rates are generally higher in public schools, such statistics do not apply to all schools. Look at your local school system and find out how your schools rank statewide and nationally to get a better idea of what your local public education programs have to offer. Scheduling a tour and meeting with the principal may also help you and your child get a better feel for the schools. So which is better? Private or public schools? How do they compare? It is a question a lot of parents and future teachers what to know the answer to. Parents ask often as they consider sending our children to private school. Any serious discussion of the issue has to consider the following factors: facilities, class size, teaching styles, budgets, and administrative support Facilities are considered main issues because some parents feel that how the school looks determines how their child will learn. Many public school facilities are impressive; others are mediocre. The same is true of private schools. In the public school system, the twin engines of political support and economic revenue base are critical. In private schools the ability to attract endowments and other forms of financial support are just as critical. Private school facilities reflect the success of the school's development team and that of the school to continue to generate alumni support. Some private K-12 schools have facilities and amenities, which surpass those found at many colleges and universities. They also offer academic and sports programs, which make full use of all those resources. It is hard to find comparable facilities in the public sector. They are rare. Public schools also reflect the economic realities of their location. Wealthy suburban schools will have more amenities than inner city schools as a rule. Let us call it a draw, overall. Class Size plays a major part in the equation because most parents want their child to have more one on one attention with their teacher. Most private schools have small class sizes. One of the key points of private education is individual attention. You need student to teacher ratios of 15:1 or better to achieve that goal of individual attention. On the other hand, a public system has to take almost anyone who lives within its boundaries. In public schools, you will generally find much larger class sizes, sometimes exceeding 35-40 students in some inner city schools. At that point, teaching rapidly degenerates into babysitting....
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