Compare Olympics Greek to Current

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Comparing Modern Olympics to Ancient Greek Olympics

The Olympics, the most popular show on TV every two years. The Olympics are very old, older then you would think, they are over 1,500 years old. The Olympics were created by the Greeks, and were held every four years, back then “Four years” was called an Olympiad.

The original Olympics Games were not invented by anybody. They were created in month Apollonius in year that we now know as 776 B.C., there was a great foot race in a meadow beside the river Alpheus at Olympia, and the one man named Coroebus was the winner. He was crowned with an olive wreath of wild olive, a garland woven from the twigs and leaves of the tree that Hercules had sought in the lands of the Hyperboreans and planted in the sacred grove near the temple of Zeus at Olympia. Therefore, Coroebus, a youth of Elis, was the very first Olympian of whom we anything more than a legendary record, this was basically how the Olympics were created.

Compare Modern Olympics to Ancient Greek Olympics

The very first civilized Games were held at Olympia, in Southern Greece in the 700 B.C.’s. When it was time for the Great Games, and there was a war, the cities would make a temporary truce so that the athletes could make it to Greece in safety, and then they would continue the war after the Olympics were over so that they could support their athlete.

“The Ancient Olympics were rather different from the
Modern Games. There were fewer events, and only free men who spoke Greek could enter, instead of Athletes from any country. Also, the games were always held at Olympia, instead of moving around to different sites every time”(Daniels, 1).

“Like our Olympics, though, winning Athletes were heroes who put their hometowns on the map. One young Athenian nobleman defended his political reputation by mentioning how he entered seven chariots in the Olympic chariot-race. This high number of entries made both the Aristocrats and the Athens look very wealthy and powerful”(Daniels, 1).

During the games, only the men could compete, they had strict rules about women when it came to the Olympics, like for example; only non-married women could watch, and if a married women was caught watching the games she was thrown off of a cliff, even if her husband was in the Olympics! That meant that they could not watch their husbands in the Olympics. Sometimes if the husband was in the Pankatron the husband could have lost a fight, or even died, so sometimes the wives would never see her husband again, after they left to do what they liked to do.

Events such as sprinting, long jump, and discus throw, javelin throw and wrestling are in the modern Olympic Games Summer Games. Other sports are excluded from the Olympics because they were way too dangerous. Chariot Racing, was one of the most popular sports in the Great Games in Greece, it was excluded from the modern Games because the chariot races were known to injure people and sometimes killing people, a lot of historical heroes, and Biblical heroes, such as Ben-Hur, are told of being involved in a chariot race. Another reason that chariot racing was excluded was that it was too unpredictable, and that they would not be able to reduce the amount of injuries and deaths because they were too unpredictable. We got the name Olympics because in the Ancient times the Games were held every Olympiad, which was four years.

We all owe our thanks to Pierre de Coubertin. Pierre was and is not well known, but he is well the reviver of the Games. In fact, he was not mentioned at all in the first Modern Olympics in 1896, even though he was the technical re-finder.

“One of the wonders of the Olympics is its ability to bring people from all over the world together to celebrate in social competition. Actually being part of that seething mob of humanity is another matter: crowds at Vancouver’s fenced-in Olympic venues move with the velocity of mud, lineups are plentiful and...
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