Compare and Contrast the Political System of Nigeria and the Uk

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Compare and contrast the political system in the UK with the political system in your country of origin. Clearly indicate your home country. The Oxford Dictionary, defined politics as ‘the activities associated with the governance of a country or area, especially the debate between parties having power’. Therefore political systems are the processes involved in decision making and the governing of nations. The purpose of this essay is to discuss the political system of both the UK and Nigeria, what it entails and also critically discuss their similarities and differences. A brief history of the political system of the UK in the eleventh century shows that it has not always been the way it presently is. The monarchy was all powerful, absolute and ruled without a representative of the people, chosen by the people. This gradually came to an end with an evolution that started in the year ‘1215 when King John was forced to sign the Magna Carta which involved him sharing power with the barons. This is regarded as the first statement of citizen rights in the world’ (Darlington, 2013). The first model of parliament was formed by King Edward the 1st in 1295. And in 1341the present day bi-cameral (House of Lords and Commons) style of parliament was formed, making the UK a kind of Democracy (Ibid). For this reason, the Monarch in the British system of government does not have political powers. The Queen is the head of state with a prime minister as the head of government, making it a constitutional monarchy. As a constitutional monarchy, the government in power governs in the name of her majesty. Officials that constitute this government are placed into power through elections apart from the members of the House of Lords. The members of the House of Lords, are people of royal breeding who have either inherited their position, had been appointed by the Queen. ‘Since 1999, the UK government has shared executive powers with the devolved governments of the Scottish Parliament,...
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