Collection of Revenue

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CHAPTER ONE
Introduction

1.1 Background of the study
Local authority revenue is the money collected from provision of service and donation from individual and other organization. Every local authority globally has its type of revenue that it collects depending upon the environments surrounding it and the type of service it offers to its resident or citizens. The availability control and use of finances are the core of any organization existence and not least local authorities, in them public services role,(Cola, 2002). Infrastructure, social and community services there is the part of and democratic system According to Wood et al (1988), revenue means the sales value of goods and service that have been supplied or sold to the customers. According to Mclaney, (1998) revenue is an increase in wealth rising from trading in goods and services. Nigel et al (1988) noted that the better the service the operations can provide, the better will the potential to attract customer and therefore generate revenue. The balance between capacities also affects revenue and demand of goods and service therefore time ensures that all demand is satisfied and no revenue is lost in any organization. The government also assists local authorities by giving grants such as road levy funds; local authorities transfer fund and contribution in lieu of rates due to the growing demand on local authorities. As the argument for new and improved services increases for essential services like closet to the citizens. According to Wakhisi (1994), it was stated that the council should seal all loopholes to enable them become financially stable by intensifying their revenue collection to effectively provide the services required to both the workers and citizens at large. The availability, control and use of finance are at the core of any organization existence, and least local authorities, in their public service delivery role. There are growing demands on local authority funding, as the requirements for now and improved services increase local authorities current or day-to-day expenditure are financed from a range of revenues, payments for the provision of services (charges, rent on property, planning permission fees etc.), commercial rates and central government grants. On the particular benefit is the comprehensive way in which it identifies the “funding gap” between the expenditure an authority should incur in delivering its services and the income it should derive from local sources Donughue. (2003). 1.2Statement of the problem

Performance of LAs varies widely. Some clearly are managing to improve service delivery and undertake new projects identified as priorities by citizens like road repairs, bridges, water supplies, drainage, market improvements, street lighting. Others are struggling with past debts, reducing their efforts to collect local revenues because of the easier money from LATF, employing ever more staff, increasing councilor allowances, and opting for projects with little or no benefit to citizens. Revenues collected by county and municipal councils include site value, land rent, area development fund, house rent, markets fees, bus parks fees and business licenses. In almost all LAs, there is a huge gap between the formally approved budget and what actually happens. The forecasted revenues cannot be collected, so most LA’s run short of money. For example the County council of Makueni annual budget report, 1998/1999, 2002/2003, and 2008/2009 financial year indicated that there was a problem in revenue collection. The county treasurer expressed her concern on the cash flow problems the council is facing due to non-payment by debtors making it unable to service the escalating debts it owes its creditors. in the department of engineering and urban planning expected income was kshs. 2,733,086 and actual income was kshs. 1,036,726, the department of health and environment...
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