Collaborative Project to Co-Ordinate Care for Patients with Dementia

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CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Page 58 Dementia multiple choice questionnaire Page 59 Read Catherine Gibbs’s practice profile on diabetic ketoacidosis Page 60 Guidelines on how to write a practice profile

Promoting positive approaches to dementia care in nursing
NS562 Hoe J, Thompson R (2010) Promoting positive approaches to dementia care in nursing. Nursing Standard. 25, 4, 47-56. Date of acceptance: July 27 2010.

Summary
This article provides an overview of factors relevant to dementia care today. The number of people experiencing dementia is increasing and dementia is at the forefront of health policy. The evidence base for person-centred approaches and interventions in dementia is expanding and nurses are central to implementing these across care settings. This is an exciting and challenging time for dementia care and nursing has a major role in leading and developing these changes in practice. The article discusses the importance of wellbeing and the Mental Capacity Act in assessing and caring for people with dementia. Psychosocial and pharmacological approaches to dementia care are described and the need to support carers of people with dementia is emphasised.

4Understand the impact of dementia on society and the implications for health resources. 4Outline the signs and symptoms of dementia. 4Explain the importance of promoting wellbeing in dementia. 4Identify the legal and ethical issues around mental capacity and consent. 4Describe the therapeutic interventions for dementia. 4Discuss the impact of caring for someone with dementia on the caregiver.

Authors
Juanita Hoe, senior clinical research associate, Research Department of Mental Health Sciences, University College London, London, and Rachel Thompson, dementia project lead, nursing department, RCN, London. Email: j.hoe@ucl.ac.uk

Introduction
With the growth of the ageing population and the predicted rise in numbers of people experiencing dementia, the need to ensure that nurses in a variety of clinical settings have an understanding of dementia has become more evident. In the next ten years, the number of people aged over 65 will increase by 15% and the number of people aged over 85 years will increase by 27% in the next ten years (Department of Health (DH) and Care Services Improvement Partnership (CSIP) 2005). There are 820,000 people with dementia living in the UK (Luengo-Fernandez et al 2010) and, as dementia affects one person in 20 aged over 65 and one person in five over 80 years, this number is expected to rise (DH and CSIP 2005, Knapp et al 2007). It is estimated that 24 million people worldwide have dementia and that this figure will double every 20 years to 42 million in 2020 and 81 million in 2040 (Ferri et al 2005). Therefore, it is increasingly likely that nurses will be in contact with someone who has dementia, particularly in acute care settings where 97% of nurses already care for someone with dementia (Alzheimer’s september 29 :: vol 25 no 4 :: 2010 47

Keywords
Carers, dementia, older people, psychosocial interventions These keywords are based on subject headings from the British Nursing Index. All articles are subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software. For author and research article guidelines visit the Nursing Standard home page at www.nursing-standard.co.uk. For related articles visit our online archive and search using the keywords.

Aims and intended learning outcomes
The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the issues relevant in dementia care for nurses working in any setting. After reading this article and completing the time out activities you should be able to: NURSING STANDARD

learning zone older people
Society 2009). There are particular challenges in acute settings as the environment is often not conducive to nursing people with dementia. The speed and pace of care delivery can increase patients’ disorientation and...
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