Clil

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CONTENT

INTRODUCTION…………………………………………………………………….4 1. What is CLIL? ..........................................................................................................5 2. Five dimensions for introducing CLIL……………………………………………..6 3. Benefits of CLIL…………………………………………………………………....7 4. History of CLIL……………………………………………………………………10 5. CLIL’S situation in Lithuania……………………………………………………...12 6. The research of CLIL’S successfulness in tertiary level…………………………...13 7. Perspectives of CLIL……………………………………………………………….15 CONCLUSION………………………………………………………………………..17 LITERATURE

INTRODUCTION

CLIL - Content and Language Integrated Learning is a part of European Commission Multilingualism, Foreign Language teaching projects.

During the CLIL program, teachers educate pupils’ with curricular subjects through communicative foreign language teaching. In CLIL teachers and learners, of content subjects, use a foreign or second language as the medium of communication and instruction. CLIL is widely seen as an excellent means of learning a language, and introducing international aspects into the teaching of content subjects. 

CLIL methodologies and theories have been taken up from the North (Sweden) to South (Spain) of the European Union and even in to Asia, Africa and South America. This program has been established decades ago in Europe, but in Lithuania CLIL it is still a kind of a novelty. The aim of this course project is to get acquainted with CLIL’S basic definitions, theories and history. Meanwhile the objectives are to investigate the status of CLIL in Lithuania and to forecast it’s perspectives in science teaching.

1. WHAT IS CLIL?

CLIL is Content and Language Integrated Learning. It is a learning approach that enables the study of another curricular subject through the medium of a foreign language. CLIL is the particular focus on a spectrum of cross-curricular teaching of languages that is currently receiving increased attention, as researchers and practitioners work to develop a place for it in mainstream education, as opposed to experimental project-based settings. [1]

CLIL refers to situations where subjects, or parts of subjects, are taught through a foreign language with dual-focused aims, namely the learning of content, and the simultaneous learning of a foreign language. [1]  

This approach involves learning subjects such as history, geography or others, through an additional language. It can be very successful in enhancing the learning of languages and other subjects, and developing in the youngsters a positive ‘can do’ attitude towards themselves as language learners. (Marsh, 2000) The subject can be entirely unrelated to language learning. For example: History lessons being taught in English in a school in Spain.

CLIL is frequently viewed as an extension of communicative language teaching, with more emphasis on pupils activity, clear goal orientation and explicit on content-specific, real-world connections. This is much more different from contexts where subject teachers are teaching their content through the medium of a foreign language .The guiding principle for the latter is predominantly the meeting of the demands of the content curriculum.[2]

The term CLIL was launched in 1994 by some of the Consortium experts as an educational solution for meeting certain challenges associated with language learning in Europe. Since then it has spread exponentially across the continent. Since 2000, there has also been uptake of CLIL methodologies in Asia, Africa and South America to either boost levels of language learning, or solve problems associates with the use of “foreign” languages as medium instruction. Globally, educational systems strive to achieve results which are always culturally and context-specific. Global uptake of CLIL has resulted in a range of different models being designed and...
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