Chicken Pox Essay

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The Chicken Pox a.k.a. Varicella Virus

Whether something serious as cancer or the common cold, each of these things started with a virus. Viruses come in many different forms. There are about 1 million different viruses and they are everywhere. A virus is a microscopic infectious agent that can replicate only inside the living cells of organisms. One of such is a virus commonly known as the Chicken Pox. The Chicken Pox is caused by a virus called ‘Varicella’, which is very contagious. Symptoms of this virus include a fever, weakness and fatigue, and a red, itchy rash. When an infected person sneezes, coughs, or breathes on another person, the virus enters the body through the mouth and nose transported on respiratory droplets. The virus begins to reproduce in the cells of the mucosal system. It quickly spreads to different parts of the body. The rash that develops usually appears on the face, scalp, chest, back, and fewer on the arms and legs. Symptoms, like the rash, usually arrive approximately two weeks after initial infection. The rash, in the form of 'spots' fill with a clear fluid and burst, sometimes causing scars, or bacterial infection. The spots continue to break out from one to five days, so they may appear on the body in different stages. The fever and malaise common in children with the disease is more serious in adults. It is always good to keep precautions and look into staying healthy. Viruses are serious issues that need to be treated. If you have not had the Chicken Pox, Vaccines are available. In rare cases do you get the virus after you get the disease. And once you catch the Chicken Pox it is unlikely to catch it again. The Chicken pox is not a severe virus, but it is just one of the million other viruses out there.

WORKS CITED:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virus

http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/chickenpox-varicella-topic-overview

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chickenpox
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