Chemistry Magic

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  • Topic: Polyvinyl acetate, Borax, Phosphorescence
  • Pages : 4 (1021 words )
  • Download(s) : 87
  • Published : January 7, 2013
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Match and Water in a Glass Science Magic Trick
Fun Trick with Fire and Water

This is a simple and interesting science magic trick involving fire and water. All you need is water, a glass, a plate, and a couple of matches. Pour water into a plate, light a match in the center of the dish and cover it with a glass. The water will be drawn into the glass.

Match and Water Trick Materials

• plate

• water

• 2 wooden matches

• a quarter or other large coin

• colored water

• narrow glass

How to Perform the Trick

1. Pour water into the plate. I colored the water with food coloring to make it easier to see. 2. Bend one of the matches so that you can set it in the water. Secure the match so that it is upright by setting a quarter or other small heavy object on the end of the match stick. 3. Use the second match to light the match that you placed on the plate. 4. Immediately invert a glass over the burning match.

5. The water will flow into the glass and will remain in the glass even after the match has been extinguished.

How To Make Glow in the Dark Slime

It only takes one more ingredient to turn normal slime into glowing slime. This is a great Halloween project, though it's fun for any time of the year. Glowing slime is safe for kids to make.

Difficulty: Easy

Time Required: about 15 minutes

Here's How:

1. Basically, you make glowing slime by adding zinc sulfide or glowing paint to normal slime. I have a lot ofslime recipes listed. As written, these instructions make a clear slime that glows in the dark. However, you could add zinc sulfide to any of the recipes for slime with different characteristics. 2. The slime is made by preparing two separate solutions, which are then mixed. You can double, triple, etc. the recipe if you want more slime. The ratio is 3 parts PVA or glue solution to 1 part borax solution, with a little glow-in-the-dark agent thrown in (measurement isn't critical)....
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