Cell Phone Radiation

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Cell Phone Radiation
Written by: Jacob Nickerson

Cell phone radiation is something we as consumers are exposed to each and every day. What effect does this have on us? Can this radiation alter the cell structures and functions of our bodies? For what amount of time can our bodies be exposed to this radiation without health risks? These are all questions many scientists and researchers are trying to answer with every day that passes.

Researchers are divided on a conclusion of whether or not cell phone radiation should be considered a health risk for humans. Several studies have recently been conducted showing serious effects cell phone radiation can have on brain tissue. In the following figure there are two pictures. The picture on the top shows a healthy rat’s brain before it has been exposed to cell phone radiation. The picture on the bottom shows the same rat’s brain after it has been exposed to cell phone radiation for several weeks. The spots located in the second figure are areas that have underwent protein leakage from blood vessels. These brains had destroyed cells in parts of the brain important to memory, movement, and learning. There was also a significant amount of damage to the neurons in the brains of adolescent rats. One main point of this study is that these rats have been exposed to the same regular radio waves humans are exposed to everyday throughout their lives. The only variable changed during this experiment was the concentrated radiation from a cell phone. This was a study lead by Professor Leeka Kheifets from the University of California, Los Angeles. (UCLA) and performed along with several other studies aimed at cell phone radiation risks with children and infants. One argument against this study is that although infants and toddlers do have undeveloped skulls, they are unlikely to receive such strong amounts of cell phone radiation while they are young, and still have much thicker skulls than the rats used in this research....
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