Causes of Imperialism

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Causes of Imperialism

In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, imperialism- a force of a

greater nation that controls a smaller, weaker nation- began to take over

many parts of the world in a frenzy. The more dominant countries at the

time, such as the United States and many European countries began

extending their influence to areas all over the world, from the Phillipines

(which would be 56.5% controlled) to the Africa (which would be 90.4%

controlled) , because they felt their "nations' will to power" was the best.

(Document 3) England began showing signs of wanting to control other

nations, because this meant that there would be more trade with other

countries. Imperialism meant more trade with other countries, and more

trade meant more money. The more money meant that the country had

more money to invest in industrialization. Industrialization also meant that

buyers and customers had to be found in which to sell their products-

another benefit of imperialism. Lastly, raw materials could be obtained

cheaply, as could cheap labor. Because the English were 
 The

machinerization of England's factories did not only change England's

economy, it changed the world. They were the first in the entire world to

experience things like materlialistic benefits, and social pricetags of

industrialization. This had happened for several reasons. England had

good transportation, an abundant labor supply, inventions that

revolutionized the manufacturing of many products (mostly the textile

industry), and a stable government. All of a sudden, factories were making

things so quickly, so efficiently, that more and more materials were

needed. Although certain machines and inventions helped, it simply wasn't

enough. There was a very big piece of the manufacturing process

missing, a piece that would improve England's manufacturing even

further. And that was...
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