Cafs Summary on Parenting and Caring

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Parenting- the process of raising and nurturing children in a family Caring- the process of looking after the needs and wellbeing of another person due to their age, illness or disability Biological parents- the parent who has provided the genetic material, either sperm or an ovum, to create a foetus Pregnancy

Planned- involves a strategic choice on when to parent. There are physical, emotional and economic impacts that result from this decision Unplanned- may result from poor knowledge about contraception, the fertility cycle or failure with contraception such as a condom tearing IVF and GIFT

In-vitro fertilisation
Occurs outside the body
Drug treatment is used to stimulate the maturation and number of ova •Egg follicles are monitored through ultrasound
Eggs are collected under general anaesthetic
Fresh sperm sample is obtained
Egg and sperm is prepared and cultured, combined and then fertilisation takes place •Following microscopic examination, viable embryos are transferred back into the uterus •Once implanted, pregnancy has occurred

Spare eggs are frozen for the future
Success depends on age, viability of sperm and level of expertise Gamete intra-fallopian transfer
Occurs inside female body
Drug treatment is used to stimulate the maturation and number of ova •Egg follicles are monitored via ultrasound
Eggs are collected under local anaesthetic
Eggs are combined with fresh sperm sample
They are returned to the fallopian tubes where fertilisation may occur •Once fertilisation occurs, embryo implants in uterus and pregnancy is monitored •Fertilisation occurs inside the body
Much more successful
Social parents- individuals with a parenting responsibility towards a child whom they do not share a genetic relationship with. Social implications are the positive and negative effects on an individual or group that occurs as a result of an action or choice made either by the individual, themself or by another person or group Legal implications are the positive and negative legal consequences or commitments that occurs as a result of an action or choice made b an individual or group FASS

Fostering- an alternative living arrangement for children whose parents are temporarily unable to care for them in their family home Legal implications
Children and young persons (care and protection Act) 1998 (NSW) •Any person fostering children who is not related to them msut have a license to foster issued by the Department of Family and Community Services •Foster carers must consult with the DCS about various parenting issues such as type of school the child will attend and faith practices •The foster cannot make medical decisions

The foster parents may be compensated for deliberate damage to child Social implications
Carers must encourage contact with the young person’s birth family and accept that he or she will probably return to their birth family •carers and their family may have mixed feelings about this especially if the young person has become part of their family •when allocating foster placements, families are sometimes split up as all children cannot be accommodated and stay together •foster children may been to have multiple placement changes such as schools and new siblings influencing their satisfaction of emotional, social and intellectual needs •30% of foster children have been abused by biological family, affecting how they meet new people as they feel angry and abandoned •problems between biological family and foster child may result in a restraining order by fostering family Adoption- the process by which the legal responsibility of parenting a child is given to a family mother than the than the biological family Legal implications

Regulated by the legislation, including Adoption Act 2000 (NSW) and Family Law Act 1975 (cth) •All legal rights and responsibilities are transferred to the adoptive parents •Change in parenting is permanent; birth parents lose...
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