Cadbury Dairymilk

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PGDM 12129– Arun K. P.
PGDM 12141– Juhi Lalwani
PGDM 12155– Ritesh Jaiswal
PGDM 12165– Shashank Sharma
PGDM 12177– Vinay A. Hamasagar

PGDM 12129– Arun K. P.
PGDM 12141– Juhi Lalwani
PGDM 12155– Ritesh Jaiswal
PGDM 12165– Shashank Sharma
PGDM 12177– Vinay A. Hamasagar

CADBURY DAIRY MILK
An Indian Perspective ……
Submitted to : Dr. H. Gayathri

CADBURY DAIRY MILK
An Indian Perspective ……
Submitted to : Dr. H. Gayathri

Table of Contents
Cadbury1
Cadbury in India1
Size of the Market2
Awards and Recognitions in India3
Product Portfolio4
The Marketing Mix5
Product5
Price6
Place7
Promotion7
Brand Analysis:9
What is a brand?9
Cadbury Dairy Milk as a brand:9
Brand Identity:10
Brand Loyalty:10
Brand Proposition:10
Brand Positioning:10
Brand Personality:11
Cadbury’s Dairy Milk – The Rebel Leader11
SWOT Analysis13
Strengths13
Opportunities13
Threats14
Segmentation & Targeting15
Descriptive:15
Geographic:15
Demographic:15
Psychographic:16
Behavioural16
Occasions:16
Benefits:16
User Status:16

Cadbury
In June 1905, Cadbury launched its first Dairy Milk bar, with a higher proportion of milk than previous chocolate bars, and it became the company's bestselling product by 1913. Fruit and Nut was introduced as part of the Dairy Milk line in 1928, soon followed by Whole Nut in 1933. By this point, Cadbury's was the brand leader in the United Kingdom. Kraft Foods Inc.

Kraft Foods is an American multinational confectionery, food and beverage producing company. It markets many brands in more than 170 countries. Twelve of its brands including Cadbury, Jacobs, Kraft, annually earn more than $1 billion worldwide. Forty of its brands are at least a century old. Purchase of Cadbury

On September 7, 2009, Kraft made a £10.2 billion takeover offer for the long-established British confectionery group Cadbury, makers of Dairy Milk and Bournville chocolate. On November 9, 2009 Kraft's £9.8bn takeover bid was rejected by Cadbury. Cadbury stated that the takeover bid was a "derisory" offer. Kraft renewed the offer under the same terms on December 4, 2009. The offer generated significant political and public opposition in the United Kingdom and abroad, even leading to calls for the government to implement a policy of economic protectionism in cases of takeovers of large companies. On January 19, 2010, Cadbury finally approved a revised offer from Kraft, valuing the confectionery business at $19.5 billion (L11.5 billion). The funding for the takeover was partially provided by the Royal Bank of Scotland, the British part-state-owned bank. The Cadbury purchase was part of the long-term strategy, of a three-year turnaround plan designed to drive the profitable growth of Kraft Foods. Cadbury’s management wanted to develop new markets and expand product range. It was assumed that the purchase of Cadbury would help Kraft products develop in new markets such as Brazil and India. Because of Cadbury’s current strong presence in those markets, India was one of its most resilient markets with sales growth of 20% and profits growing at 30% in a competitive market. Kraft believed the Cadbury purchase was also necessary because of the likelihood of Nestle and Hershey joining together. Kraft also believed it could squeeze savings of at least $675m annually by the end of the third year. The Kraft Foods management saw the merger as a logical next step in our transformation toward a high-growth, higher-margin company. The organization also justified the merger in order to build a "global powerhouse in snacks, confectionery and quick meals." Following the purchase of Cadbury, Kraft commanded 14.8% of the global candy and gum market. Kraft argued that it could take advantage of the Cadbury distribution in developing markets of India, Brazil and Mexico. As incomes rise in these developing nations, Kraft hopes that products...
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