Business Studies

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RETAILERS

By – Yash Khanna.

Group members:

Acknowledgement

I’d like to thank my Business Studies teacher,
Mrs.Shailaja Nair ma’am,
for helping and guiding us throughout the creation of this project. I would also like to thank my teammates, Eesha Bajaria, Aastha Thakkar, Akansha Jane, Dharini Narayan, Urvi Sharma, and Kainaz Tanveer, for helping in the making of this project and succeeding in helping it achieve its current level. Thanks must also be extended to our Principal, Mrs. Bijoya Baksi, for providing us with the opportunity to work on such a wonderful and educational project that helped all of us understand the realities of transactions in retailer trade, and to the proprietors of all the retail outlets which we visited, for providing us with the information necessary in the formation of this project. Finally, I would like to thank my parents for being a source of unconditional love and support, and for unquestioningly complying with any demands that I may have made during this duration.

Index

• Definition
• Types of Retail Outlets
• Questionnaire
• Interviews
• My interview at purva general store
• Comparisons
• Analysis
• Difficulties
• Expenses Incurred
• Experiences
• Bibliography

Definition

The sale of physical goods or merchandise from fixed outlets, such as a kiosk or store, in small quantities for direct consumption by the purchaser instead of resale is known as retail.

Retail may also include services which are considered subordinate, such as delivery. Retail is the end of the supply-chain – retailers buy goods in large quantities from producers, manufacturers, or wholesalers, and sell them directly to the final consumers. Thus, retail establishments are often known as “shops” or “stores”.

Manufacturers often see retail as an essential and immovable part of the supply chain, terming it necessary for the distribution and sale of goods.

Types of Retail Outlets

There are the following types of retailers by marketing strategy: • Department stores: These are enormous stores containing an assortment of “hard” and “soft” goods. A retailer who owns such a store offers a variety of objects, almost all at extremely affordable prices. They also offer considerable consumer service facilities. Walmart is a good example of the above.

• Discount stores: They tend to offer a wide array of products and services. However, they compete on price offers extensive assortment of merchandise for low, affordable prices. They tend to stay away from big brands, focussing instead on less fashion-oriented brands.

• Warehouse stores: They offer low-cost, high-quantity goods piled on pallets or steel shelves in warehouses

• Variety stores: Extremely low-cost goods are available here. However, the selection is limited.

• Mom-And-Pop: This is a retail outlet that is owned and operated by individuals. The products are few in number, and selective besides. They are often seen in the local community, and tend to be family-run businesses.

• Specialty stores: A specialty store generally focuses on a specific category, and tries to provide a high rate of service in the chosen category. A pharmaceutical store is an example of this.

• General stores: A small store, generally found in rural areas, that sells enough items to satisfy the needs of the local community.

• Convenience stores: They are essentially found only in
residential areas. Although charging higher-than-average
prices, they offer a speedy checkout, thus making them ideal foremergency purchases.

• Hypermarkets: They provide a huge variety and volume
of merchandise at low prices. Their operating cost is also
comparatively less.

• Supermarkets: They are large, self-serving shops selling food and household goods.

•Malls: They offer an...
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