Business Ethics Test

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 45
  • Published : November 14, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
1.1
Ethics
a branch of philosophy that studies the nature of right and wrong The Moral Formula
An expression that would explain and define morality
would let us be able to solve all current and future moral dilemmas an answer key to moral questions

1.2
Ethical Objectivism
belief that claims there is a universally valid moral code
basically, if something is morally wrong for one person, than it should be morally wrong for all people cultural beliefs about morality vary, but cultural acceptance doesn’t make something morally correct morality is not a matter of opinion but fact

Problem is that there is too much disagreement among cultures and people about what is right and wrong so much disagreement that it leads people to believe that there is not true right and wrong There is one complete set of morally right answers

1.3
Ethical Relativism
belief that claims there is no such thing as a universally valid moral code basically, there is no completely right answer
Two types: Conventionalism and subjectivism
Problem is that ethical relativism condones some very controversial cultural practices like slavery, human sacrifices, and nazism Also it is very rare for an entire culture of people to unanimously agree about whether something is right or wrong How does one even define culture?

There is no one complete set of morally right answers

1.4
Conventionalism
The belief that there is no universally valid moral code and that morality is relative to culture Morality itself is culturally defined
If two cultures disagree about morality of an action, they can both be right When something is wrong, it is actually just wrong according to our culture -Cultural Imperialism
What ethical relativists call ethical objectivism due to its habit of imposing moral code on other cultures

Every culture has a different set of morally right answers

1.5
Subjectivism
the belief that there is no universally valid moral code and that morality is relative to each individual each individual is the sole creator of his or her own morality our moral beliefs cannot possibly be mistaken

condones murderers and rapists
Every person has a different set of morally right answers

1.6
Relativism about Truth
the belief that there is no such thing as truth and everything is simply a matter of opinion the most extreme version of relativism
there is no such thing as facts
people often confuse agreement of opinions with truth
Nothing is true, everything is a matter of opinion, not fact

1.9
Carr’s Poker Analogy
Lying may be wrong in everyday context, however not in a game of poker or in the game of business where lying and bluffing is simply part of the business Situations or contexts alter what is morally right or morally wrong Problem is that the game of business the consumer is arguably not aware that there is any game States that people can pretty much be unethical in when dealing with business Contextualism

the belief that morality is relative to a context in which an action is done basically it says that stealing bread may be wrong in most circumstances, but if you are stealing bread to feed your starving child it may not be wrong

2.1
Immanuel Kant
formulated Deontological moral theory
18th century German philosopher
Deontological Moral Theory
The belief that since some actions like murdering and raping are always morally wrong, we have the duty not murder or rape No one is every justified to ever perform an action that is always morally wrong under any circumstances strongly opposes the principle that the “end justifies the means” in other words completely disagrees with the beliefs in “Wanted” where they kill one to save a thousand People should never perform an action that is morally wrong because they know that it is wrong to do so, not because they are worried about how people and society will look at them intentions are important

The problem is there really is no action that is wrong under every situation....
tracking img