Bullying

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  • Topic: Bullying, Abuse, School bullying
  • Pages : 11 (3507 words )
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  • Published : April 20, 2013
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School bullying is a type of bullying that occurs in connection with education, either inside or outside of school. Bullying can be physical, verbal, oremotional and is usually repeated over a period of time.[2][3] In schools, bullying occurs in all areas. It can occur in nearly any part in or around the school building, though it more often occurs in PE, recess, hallways, bathrooms, on school buses and waiting for buses, classes that require group work and/or after school activities.[citation needed] Bullying in school sometimes consists of a group of students taking advantage of or isolating one student in particular and gaining the loyalty of bystanders who want to avoid becoming the next victim. These bullies taunt and tease their target before physically bullying the target. Targets of bullying in school are often pupils who are considered strange or different by their peers to begin with, making the situation harder for them to deal with. One student or a group can bully another student or a group of students. Bystanders may participate or watch, sometimes out of fear of becoming the next victim. However, there is some research suggesting that a significant proportion of "normal" school children may not evaluate school-based violence (student-on-student victimization) as negatively or as being unacceptable as much as adults generally do, and may even derive enjoyment from it, and they may thus not see a reason to prevent it if it brings them joy on some level.[4] Bullying can also be perpetrated by teachers and the school system itself: There is an inherent power differential in the system that can easily predispose to subtle or covert abuse (relational aggression or passive aggression), humiliation, or exclusion — even while maintaining overt commitments to anti-bullying policies.[5][6][7] Anti-bullying programs are designed to teach students cooperation, as well as training peer moderators in intervention and dispute resolution techniques, as a form of peer support.[citation needed] Contents [hide] * 1 Types * 1.1 Physical bullying * 1.2 Emotional bullying * 1.3 Verbal bullying * 1.4 Cyber-bullying * 1.5 Sexual bullying * 1.6 Homophobic bullying * 2 High school bullying * 3 Statistics * 4 Short-term and long-term effects * 5 Complex dynamics of a school bullying culture * 6 Strategies to reduce school bullying * 7 Semiotics of bullying in schools * 8 Forms * 9 Associations * 10 Identifying * 11 Legal recourse in the US * 12 In popular culture * 13 See also * 14 References * 15 Further reading * 16 External links| -------------------------------------------------

[edit]Types
[edit]Physical bullying
See also: Physical abuse

A bully, portrayed in the 1917 silent filmRebecca of Sunnybrook Farm Physical bullying is any unwanted physical contact between the bully and the victim. This is one of the most easily identifiable forms of bullying. Examples include:[2][8] * punching

* pushing
* shoving
* kicking
* slapping
* headlocks
* school pranks
* teasing
* fighting
* Use of available objects as weapons
[edit]Emotional bullying
See also: Psychological abuse
Emotional bullying is any form of bullying that causes damage to a victim’s psyche and/or emotional well-being. Examples include:[2][8] * spreading malicious rumors about people
* keeping certain people out of a "group"
* getting certain people to "gang up" on others (It also could be considered physical bullying) * ignoring people on purpose - the silent treatment
* harassment
* provocation
* whispering to another in front of someone - whispering campaign * keeping secrets away from a so-called friend
* eye rolling, silent, but hurtful body motions such as pointing, face making [edit]Verbal bullying
See also: Verbal abuse
Verbal bullying is any slanderous statements or accusations that cause the victim undue emotional...
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