Buddhist Philosophy and Its Concepts

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BUDDHIST PHILOSOPHY!
SELECT ANY 2 OR 3 IMPORTANT CONCEPTS OR ISSUES THAT ARE ADDRESSED IN THE BUDDHIST PHILOSOPHY. EXPLAIN WHY THESE ARE IMPORTANT TO CONSTITUTE THE CHINESE TRADITIONAL VALUE.

Buddhism was introduced into China during the first century CE. This was during the Han dynasty. The main ideology during the Han period was Confucianism. Therefore, Buddhism did not have much influence on the lives of the majority of the people in China. However, during the third and fourth centuries CE, China once again became divided by ethnic and territorial wars. It was then that Confucianism lost its place as the state-sponsored ideology. This resulted in Buddhist religious and philosophical ideas being considered by the non-Han Chinese tribes. In the sixth century, doctrinal differences in strands of Chinese Buddhism began to become more evident. This established the Chinese Buddhist doctrine as separate from both Indian Buddhism, and distinct from Daoism and Confucianism.

Five Buddhist doctrines developed during the fifth and sixth centuries in China. All of these doctrines were influenced by themes and concepts in Chinese philosophy. Three treatise (San Lun) Buddhism

This doctrine advocated the Madhyamaka (middle doctrine) and was introduced by Kumarajiva into China. This doctrine derives its name from three main texts from the Madhyamaka tradition. These three texts are The treatise on the twelve gates, The treatise on the middle way and The one-hundred-verse treatise. This doctrine holds that the world as perceived through our senses is not real. Consciousness-only (Wei Shi) Buddhism

This derives from the Yogacara strain in India. Mahayanist philosophy consists of two main branches including Yogacara and Madhyamaka. Xuan Zang played an important role in developing consciousness-only doctrine. He proposed that all perceived objects are experiences, therefore denying the substantial reality of matter. This doctrine holds in epistemological terms, that...
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