Book Review of a Thousand Splendid Suns

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Book Review of A Thousand Splendid Suns

17th century Afghanistan poet Saib-e-Tabrizi wrote this commendatory poem after visiting Kabul. ‘Every street of Kabul is enthralling to the eye; Through the bazaars, caravans of Egypt pass; One could not count the moons that shimmer on her roofs; And the thousand splendid suns that hide behind her walls.’   In this world there are still many women say that they are suffering unfair treatment and demand for the right to vote, the right to manage. But to the women who had experienced two Afghanistan war (The first time Afghanistan war: from 1979 to 1989, the former Soviet Union armed invasion of Afghanistan. Second Afghanistan war: the second Afghanistan war in 2001 is based on United States-led coalition forces on October 7, 2001 for Afghanistan war cover to the Organization and the Taliban, for the United States on the revenge of the 911 incident, also marks the start of the war against terrorism. Not ended. ), the only thing what they want is to live. Khaled Hosseini has lived in the United States since he was fifteen years old and is an American citizen. His 2003 debut novel, The Kite Runner, was an international bestseller, selling more than 12 million copies worldwide. His second, A Thousand Splendid Suns, was released on May 22, 2007. In 2008, the book was the bestselling novel in Britain (as of April 11, 2008), with more than 700,000 copies sold. In 2006, he was appointed United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (Office) goodwill ambassadors, currently residing in Northern California. The Buffalo News says ‘Hosseini's literary abilities are such that he is able to do what all great artists do: take individual stories and, through the alchemy of insight, compassion and expression, universalize them—thereby turning them into art.’ For reasons why he wrote this novel, Khaled Hosseini is saying ' although life is filled with pain and bitterness but each a sad plot can let people see hope in the Sun. Each faces behind dusty has a soul. Dedicated to Afghanistan's women. In 2003, returning to Kabul I see wearing traditional female twos and threes to go masked costume in the streets, was trailing behind their children dressed in rags, begging passers-by give change. At that moment, I would like to know, where they have been taken to life. What they dream, hope and desire? Did they talk about love? Husband how man? Spread in Afghanistan in the years to 20 years of war, they lost what? I talked with many women in Kabul; their stories are real people and heart. When I began to write of the thousand splendid Suns (a Thousand Splendid Suns), I find myself constantly think of those full of toughness of Afghanistan women. I though they may not be thrown describing Laila or Mariam source of inspiration for the role of the story, however their voices, faces and life stories of perseverance has always haunted me, and about the novel, I had a most inspiring is from Afghanistan collective spiritual power of women.’ Mariam (She is my favorite role in this book), the illegitimate child of a Herat businessman, is forced into a loveless marriage at age fifteen to a middle-aged Kabul shoemaker, Rasheed. He demands absolute obedience from his spouse, as well as strict observance of Islamic customs restricting the movement, appearance and attire of women. In the early years of their marriage, Rasheed's mandates run counter to the modernizing forces in Kabul, where many women hold professional jobs, teach at the university, or run for public office. But with the rise of the Taliban, a whole society falls into lockstep with these dictates of Sharia, traditional Muslim law. Laila, a woman young enough to be Mariam's daughter, becomes a reluctant member of this household, when her parents are killed in a bombing, and all her friends have either die d or departed from Kabul. Rasheed takes her on as a second wife, and his bullying and overbearing behavior grow all the worse as the two women...
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