Book Review

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Polytechnic University of the Philippines
College of Arts and Letters
Department of History
Sta. Mesa, Manila

A Book Review
Of the book

Tinguians: Death of a Culture
Presented to
Prof. Maria Rhodora Agustin

In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Subject of Philippine Pre-History

Presented by
Rica Mae G. Dominguez
Bachelor of Arts in History 2-1

March 4, 2013

Tinguians: Death of a Culture
By: Nid Anima

I. Introduction

II. About the Author

III. Summary

IV. Strengths and Weaknesses of the Book

V. Importance of the Book

VI. Analysis and Suggestions

I. INTRODUCTION

The book “Tinguian: Death of a Culture” written by Nid Anima discusses the historically-elusive culture of the Tinguians that continues to elude today’s historians and anthropologists. This is a book review that attempts to summarize its contents and analyse the influence that the Tinguian tribe has done to Filipino history before the Spaniards, its co-existence with other people of its time and, most importantly, its culture.

Even now, the Philippines remains an archipelago alive with natural bounties and plentiful livestock. All over the country, tall mountains stand sentinel and home to green forests and hide promises of the coast and the sea.

The Tinguians are an ethnic tribe predating most other ethnic tribes in the Philippines. What proof anthropologists have of the tribe is little and often incidental in nature. From passing mentions and stories to actually having found pottery fragments and other concrete evidences, the Tinguians are indeed still a mysterious ethnic group.

From what we know of them, the Tinguians are a tribe speculated to still persist in the northern part of Luzon, in the mountain provinces. They have come from several places all over Asia, and thus have brought several culturally-different influences and ideas that became the foundations of other tribes’ cultures.

The tribe, along with the other Ilocano peoples in the provinces, were said to have been in good trade relations with China, Borneo and Japan, from since 1406 – a good century prior to the arrival of the Spaniards.

The Tinguians arrived and settled near the coastlines of the north, but were forced to retreat to the mountains when the Spaniards came. It was when the Spaniards came that they were branded “Tinguianes”, a name simply used to identify the members of the tribe, but according to other sources, they referred to themselves as Itneg. The Tinguians were pagans, though, so the Spaniards stopped at nothing and continued to cover conquest with Christianity to set the vibe.

In the later years, a number of Tinguians have already been Christianized, and oppressed into a somewhat subservient truce, and even the Ilocano peoples have barged into their territory too. They conducted headhunts for reprisal (even retribution), but are now no longer done as the hatred has simmered down.

II. ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Nid Alcantara Anima

Nid Anima is an aged Filipino writer whose books delve into the Filipino world – the Philippines and its peoples, the Filipino culture and our customs, among a number of other topics. He was born on March 3, 1940 at Bangued, Abra an currently stays in Paranaque City along the National Capital Region’s vicinity. He took his colleged education at Manuel L. Quezon University under the College of Liberal Arts. He now works as a Writer-Publisher. With regards of that here’s a glimpse of those books that he hath authored both fiction and non-fiction. * A Family Odyssey, a novel

* Father Goes to the Cockpit, a novel
* TINGUIAN : Death of a Culture
* Filipino Ethnic Games
* Filipino Martial Arts
* Witchcraft, Filipino-style
* In Defense of Cockfighting
* And many other books.,
He has already received an award which is a Short story writing grant at CCP, 1989 He is also a member of different organizations including PEN...
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