Bolivian Food

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Bolivian Food

Although it has been said that breakfast is the most important meal of the day but, in Bolivia lunch is the main meal of day. It usually includes soup and a main dish. The potato is the main staple, served at most meals, sometimes with rice or noodles. Bolivian food is not often spicy, but a sauce "la llajwa" is usually available which is made with tomato and locoto (hot chilies). ( Bolivian food uses meat in a lot of dishes, and this meat is either fried or boiled. Bolivians also use fish like Trout as a main protein in their dishes. Breakfast (desayuno)

Bolivians tend to eat a very simple breakfast, usually consisting of tea or sometimes coffee, and marraqueta bread rolls. Occasionally, cheese, honey or jam is taken. A more native breakfast beverage is api, also known as chicha morada, served hot. In the market of Copacabana, buñuelos, drizzled with cane syrup, are an extremely popular breakfast treat. Much like in the U.S., children are often served breakfast cereal and milk in the morning. This sort of breakfast is becoming popular with Bolivian adults as well.

Mid-morning snack

Since breakfast is usually very light and simple, the customary Bolivian snack at 10:30 AM is an empanada known as the salteña, often consumed with more api, coffee, or a soft drink such as a Coca-Cola or a Papaya Salvietti.

Lunch (almuerzo)

Almuerzo is the most important meal of the Bolivian day, so much so that daily life tends

to revolve around it. Workers return home to dine on sopa y segundo, the obligatory course order. Sometimes a green salad is offered as an opener, then soup, then the main course. Lunch is taken at a leisurely pace and is traditionally followed by a nap, the oft-referred siesta.

Teatime (té)

Strangely, and very much like the British, Bolivians observe an afternoon tea break. Cups of black tea are usually taken with biscuits such as galletas...
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