Bend It Like Beckham/as You Like It

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Belonging is a necessary human desire of acceptance and inclusion which can be represented in several different ways. Shakespeare’s classic, As you like it and in Gurinda Chadra’s comedy, Bend it like Beckham, are both representations of the concept of belonging. Bend it like Beckham is a modern interpretation which explores similar notions as Shakespeare’s classic As you like it. In all three texts belonging is represented through gender roles, family influence and the connection of marriage.

The central character, Jessminder, in bend it like beckham must overcome her cultural restraints as a young indian girl raised in a western civilisation in order to belong to her family and satisfy her own goals. This is seen in the opening scene as Jessminders

Her parents adhere to their strict sihk faith customs which clash with Jessminders dream of becoming an alete football player just as David Beckham. The extended metaphor of football within bend it like beckham is used to shape Chadra's representation of belonging and not belonging.

Bend it like Beckham is a film based around the life of a young Indian girl, Jessminder, whose parents follow the Sikh religion. Without question, Jess is expected to follow the cultural traditions besides being raised within a westernised culture in England. The title Bend it like Beckham is the reference to David Beckham’s ability to curve the football across the field scoring a goal. Football is used as an extended metaphor throughout the film which has helped shape Chadra’s representation of Jessminder not being able to belong to the gender prejudice sport, football.

Shakespeare’s As you like it uses similar concepts as Bend it like Beckham to communicate a significance of belonging. Members of the court are exiled and flee to the forest of Arden for fear of

Gender roles are reversed in the movie ‘Bend it like Beckham’. Tony is a friend of Jessminder who also enjoys playing football, but when he explains he “really, really likes Beckham” we understand that he has feelings for the opposite sex. Tony believes his true identity will be ridiculed in an Indian family therefore keeping it a secret. Jessminder understands Tony’s cultural restrictions in being himself completely, which forms the basis of their empathetic relationship.

Rosalind in As you like it has the ability to subvert the limitations that society imposes on her as a woman in order to isolate herself from the common conformities of belonging in her society. With the courage and wit of a male, announces to Celia where she describes that she will wear a warrior look like many cowardly men do which insinuates that a man’s manner and attire show’s nothing of their courage. The dramatic irony imposed on the audience when Rosalind disguises herself is used as a technique to entertain and humour the viewers as their knowledge of the correct situation is seen as advantageous. Rosalind disguises herself as a man named Ganymede in order to apprise and woo her love interest Orlando. We'll have a swashing and a martial outside, as many other mannish cowards have That do outface it with their semblances. (1.3.125) is a quote in which Roseland

During her deception as Ganymede, Orlando is instructed on the ways to woo a woman to Rosalind’s desire. The pair become intimate in their rehearsal roles and share a kiss after the line …. To an Elizabethan audience, homoeroticism was seen as entertaining in an outrageous sense. The idea of homosexuality was highly dammed by the Elizabethan society with little awareness about such possibilities. A scene containing same sex interest without the dramatic irony would not be allowed to be performed.

We note both Juliette and Jessminder obtaining boyish characteristics which lead to the misconception of Juliette being attracted to Jessminder by her mother, and Jessminder’s family misunderstanding seeing her kissing a boy, when in fact it was...
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