Barriers to Communication

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Barriers to Communication
Physical (time, environment, comfort, needs, physical medium) •Cultural (ethnic, religious, and social differences)
Perceptional (viewing what is said from your own mindset) •Motivational (mental inertia)
Experiential (lack of similar experience)
Emotional (personal feelings at the moment)
Linguistic (different languages or vocabulary)
Non-verbal (non-word messages)
Competition (noise, doing other things besides listening) •Words (we assign a meaning to a word often because of culture -- note the difference in the meaning of "police" (contrast Berrien Springs versus Benton Harbor or any inner city perspective) or "boy" (contrast white male with black male perspectives) •Context (high / low)

Purpose (example: note the difference in communication between men versus women; for men it's report-talk versus rapport-talk or information versus bonding •Mode (differences in way a message is sent). Note the black versus white modes: BlackWhite

High keyed
Person Oriented Low keyed
Controlled / Self-Restrained
Task Oriented
Blacks perceive whites as detached, devious, impersonal, condescending, hypocritical, avoiding eye contact, and too silentWhites perceive blacks as aggressive, over-emotional, angry, confrontational, interruptive, too personal, showboating •Gestures (misunderstood gestures are a major barrier see discussion on non-verbal language) •Variations in language – accent, dialect

Slang - jargon - colloquialism
Different forms or reasons for verbal interaction
Dueling – seeing who can get the upper hand (playing the dozens) Repartee conversation – taking short turns rather than monologue Ritual conversation – standard replies with little meaning to words themselves (i.e. most US greetings) Self-disclosure. The level of self-disclosure is culturally determined. Not all cultures wish to give personal...
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