Barriers in Communication

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Barriers of communication
I.Noise
Noise refers to the distraction and interference in the environment in which communication takes place. This affects the accuracy, clarity or event the arrival of the message. Noise can be further classified into four different types.

1.Physical noise.
2.Technical noise.
3.Social noise.
4.Psychological noise.

1.Physical noise
Obstruction caused by environmental factors is termed as physical noise. Physical noise may include noise of the other people taking, passing of traffic, passing of people near the communicating area. This may prevent a message from being heard clearly.

2.Technical Noise
This noise involves the failure of the medium of communication. It includes, crackle on the telephone line or illegible handwriting etc. This may prevent the exchange of communication.

3.Social Noise
It is the interference caused by differences in personality and cultures of the members communicating. It includes difficulties faced by people who have different in ages, castes, social status etc.

4.Psychological Noise
It includes excessive such as emotion, prejudice, nervousness etc. How the receiver feels at the time of receipt of communication message will influence how he or she interprets it. The same message received when sender are angry is often interpreted differently when sender are happy. Extreme emotions such as jubilation or depression are most likely to hinder effective communication.

1.Types of barriers to communication
At above the concept of noise was introduced. Noise is common but it varies with degree. On the low end of the scale, noise such as radio station static is a minor irritant that hampers but does not completely block the transfer of understanding. But at the high end of the scale noise can become an impenetrable barrier to communication. There are four types of communication barriers that represent extreme forms of noise: 1: Process barriers

2: Physical barriers
3: Semantic barriers and
4: Psychosocial barriers

1: Process barriers
Every process in communication process is necessary for effective communication. Blocked steps become barriers. Considered the following situations. * Sender barriers
An untrained person with and unusual new idea fails to speak up at a meeting for fear of criticism.

* Encoding barriers
A Spanish-speaking factory worker or we can say that a Spanish- speaking politician cannot get an English speaking supervisor or a politician cannot speak English with English speaking speaker to understand a grievance about working condition or affairs of the country.

* Medium barriers
After getting no answer three times and a busy signal twice a customer concludes that a store, s consumer hot line is a waste of time.

* Decoding barrier
An older manager not sure what a young supervisor means what he refers to an employee as “spaced out”. * Receiver barriers
A manager who is preoccupied with the preparation of a budget asks a subordinate to repeat an earlier statement.

* Feedback barrier
During on the job training the failure of the trainee to ask any questions causes a manager to wonder if there is any real understanding.

The complexity of the communication process itself is a potentially formidable barrier to communication. Malfunctions anywhere along the line can singly or collectively block the transfer of understanding.

2: Physical barriers
Sometime a physical object blocks effective communication. For example a riveter who wears ear protectors probably cannot hear someone yell fire. Distance is another physical barriers. The 2000 , 3000 or more distance from Lahore to Kuwait, Iraq, or New York and the time zone differences can complicate coast-to-coast communication in a nationwide organization. People often take physical barriers for grand but sometimes they can be removed. For example an inconveniently positioned wall in an office can be torn out. An appropriate choice of media is especially...
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