At the End of the Play the Prince Says: “Some Shall Be Pardon’d and Some Punished…” Whom Would You Blame for the Tragic Deaths of Romeo and Juliet?

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At the end of the play the prince says: “Some shall be pardon’d and some punished…” Whom would you blame for the tragic deaths of Romeo and Juliet?

Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy about lovers who end up killing themselves because they think that they cannot be together. Many people contributed to bringing about the tragic deaths of Romeo and Juliet. Some should be pardoned and some punished, but I think that the tragic deaths were caused mainly by fate. Juliet’s parents are partly to blame for the deaths of Romeo and their daughter. Lady Capulet seemed to be an extremely strict and pushy mother. “Do as thou wilt, for I have done with thee.” She and her husband should have paid more attention to Juliet’s wishes and should not have been so hard on her. When Juliet refused to marry Paris, Capulet was furious.“ Hang thee … disobedient wretch” As head of his family Capulet had the authority to stop the feud and should have tried harder to do so. However, Capulet does stop Tybalt from fighting with Romeo at the masque and at the beginning of the play when Paris asks him if he can marry Juliet, Capulet acts like a good father and tells Paris that he does not want his daughter to marry too young and really does seem to care about her. “She’s the hopeful lady of my earth” Romeo’s parents, Montague and Lady Montague, should have tried to get closer to their son. Though at the beginning of the play when Romeo is in love with Rosaline, his parents do appear to be genuinely worried about him, they do not talk to him themselves but instead send Benvolio. They do not come into the play very much which I think is an indication that they were not a significant part of Romeo’s life. If they had had a better relationship with their son, Romeo might have confided in them and his early death may have been avoided. At the end of the play, Montague announces that his wife died:

“my wife is dead tonight; Grief of my son’s exile hath stopp’d her...
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