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Assignment 1

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Bounmy Sinouanthavysouk
Course NT1330, Mr B.
01/11/13 Unit 2 Assignment.

Facilitation

Dear IT Admin:
I am working at a branch office and have been tasked with changing out the DHCP scope to match the overall corporate IP address scheme. The main office assigned me and IP address range of 192.168.0.200 through 192.168.0.225. I changed the scope on Friday afternoon and came in on Monday morning to discover that only some of the workstations had picked up the new leases from the new DHCP scope. Any ideas as to what may be happening, what I might check or adjust?

Dear Junior Admin:
After reading the problem you are having, I too have run into a similar situation in the pass and from my experience this is the advice I can give you and what to do to figure out what might be the cause and how to solve the issue at hand.

A DHCP scope determines which IP addresses are allocated to clients. A scope defines a set of IP addresses and associated configuration information that can be supplied to a DHCP client. A scope must be defined and activated before DHCP clients can use the DHCP server for dynamic TCP/IP configuration. You can configure as many scopes on a DHCP server as needed for your network environment. A DHCP administrator can create one or more scopes on one or more Winders Server 2008 servers running the DHCP server service. However, because DHCP servers do not communicate scope information with each other, you must be careful to define scopes so that multiple DHCP servers are not assigning the same IP address to multiple clients or assigning addresses that are statically assigned to existing IP hosts. The IP addresses defined in a DHCP scope must be contiguous and are associated with a subnet mask. If the addresses you want to assign are not contiguous, you must create a scope encompassing all the addresses you want to assign and then exclude specific addresses or address ranges from the scope. So just be sure to check how you have your DHCP...