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Legislative power vested in Congress
Legislative power vested in Congress. Legislative power means the authority to make laws. It is then vested into the Congress. Vested into the Congress, which pertains that it is law making is assigned to the Congress. When we say Congress, it means two Houses. The two Houses are: House of Representatives which Houses the Congressmen / Congresswomen and the House of Senate which Houses the Senators. In the Philippines, we exercise bicameralism. By bicameralism, it means that there are two legislative bodies. Before, in the 1935 Constitution we practice unicameral set-up. Unicameral set-up, which means that there is only one legislative body, only one House makes a law. In the unicameral set-up, the only House present is the House of the Representatives. We tend to select one representative to represent us. In the 1973 Constitution, we are now practicing bicameralism with House of Representatives and House of Senators as the law makers. However, there’s always a good and bad side of the story, so as the bicameralism has it’s fair share of advantages and disadvantages. Advantages of Bicameralism

Among the arguments propounded in favor of bicameralism are: * A second chamber (Senate) is necessary to serve as a check to hasty and ill-considered legislation; * It is not underestimating the way where the House of Representatives pass some laws. But, it wouldn’t hurt if there could be another House to check some hurried and not carefully considered laws. Moreover, the laws that are going to be passed will be proofread properly and carefully considered. * It serves as a training ground for future leaders;

* Most of, if not most, of the Presidents that we have had, had become a Senator first before they were able to reach that position. It is a must for them to be trained onto how law making happens. It is a way for them to learn how to govern a country. * It provides a representation for both regional and national interests; * By having a House of Representatives alone, we are able to gather the concerns of different places. It is because, these Representatives represents a certain place, so their interests are directly accommodated. Same is true with the House of Senate, these people have different concerns to address to, which is directly heard and managed. Take for instance, a certain Senator who is advocating on imposing laws that are in favor of child and women rights. * A bicameral legislature is less susceptible to bribery and control of big interests; and * By bribery, we meant that it is an act of letting one does such thing which is in favor of another. In bicameralism, as we’ve said there are two Houses. If there’s a bribery going on in the House of Representatives then the law to be passed will still be reviewed by the House of the Senate. Thus, whatever bribery and control of big interests there is, it would at least be lessened because there’s still another House to review the laws to be passed on. * It is the traditional form of legislative body dating from ancient times; as such, it has been tested and proven in the crucible of human experience. * We, the Filipino people, tend to be culture oriented. Culture oriented enough that we believe that we must follow what is traditionally done. We believe that, this method has been done before, thus we must practice it up to now because it is tested and proven to be effective. However, the other side of the story is that the bicameralism has also its disadvantages. These disadvantages, mostly contradicts what is in the advantages list. Disadvantages of Bicameralism

Some of the arguments against it are:
* The bicameral set-up has not worked out as an effective fiscalizing machinery; * Though it could check hasty and ill-considered laws to be passed, having bicameralism is had not showed that it is effective in inspecting some errors. It is still prone...
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