Art101-Painting Styles

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Painting Styles

Neoclassicism was an art movement closely associated with the era beginning from the end of the 17th century through the 18th-century. The Neoclassicism art movement came from a combination of the last half of Baroque art to the burgeoning scientific interest in classical Greek and Roman antiquity (Sayre, 2010). This new found art of Neoclassicism led to the cause in a rapid growth of collections of antiques (Sayre, 2010). In addition, during the Neoclassicism art movement artist stumbled across an unforeseen problem, in which neoclassical artists were unsure as to whether an image of a hero or famous person in artwork should be portrayed as in the traditional Classical or Contemporary costume. Furthermore, neoclassical artists were not known to have incorporated gestures and emotions in images within their artworks (Sayre, 2010). For example, this is visible in a piece of artwork from the Neoclassicism movement known as The Emperor Napoleon in His Study at the Tuileries.

The Emperor Napoleon in His Study at the Tuileries is an astonishing piece of artwork by neoclassical artist Jacques Louis David in 1812. This particular piece of artwork was originally painted on a canvas with oil (National Gallery of Art, 2009). In addition, this particular painting portrays a portrait of three subjects also known as that of Napoleon, soldier, emperor, and administrator (National Gallery of Art, 2009). This paintings style and technique are typical to that of the neoclassicism movement, in which virtue has been reinforced by simple lines, and where color helps to enhance moral perfection along with measure and proportions. Furthermore, the artist here as accomplished a sense of order and harmony as well as perfection, in the painting of the Emperor Napoleon.

Impressionism was an art movement closely associated with the late 19th century to early 20th century (Sayre, 2010). According to Sayre, 2010, the Impressionism art...
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