Art in Yoruba

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  • Topic: Orisha, Monarch, Yoruba people
  • Pages : 1 (334 words )
  • Download(s) : 39
  • Published : December 10, 2012
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Yoruba is not your typical way when you think about their rulers and what they mean. Yoruba puts a lot into what they wear, and what they represent. Almost everything they put on has some meaning to their past rulers or something they cherish. Even where they live has some type of meaning, which I think bring the whole town together. The most important part of the Yoruba king’s regalia (outfit) is the crown. The symbolic power of the crown is reinforced by the figures of birds all around the crown. Where the birds are placed on the crown, is a prominent positioning on the royal crown thus appears to strengthen the kings power and status from other people. When the Yoruba king gets ready for important ceremonies they convey an image of majesty, power, and wealth, and beauty. One type of crown that the Yoruba kings would wear is a tall conical shapes of the royal beaded crowns it gives visual prominence to the head, which is the central place that the Yoruba kings used that of ideas of destiny, spiritual power, and character, and beauty. Today the rulers of Yoruba beaded regalia included not only crowns and scepters, but also gowns, leggings, and boots. Four of the most important of these gods were linked to the cardinal directions, their shrines being positioned accordingly, Ogun “north” means red, Eshu “east” green/yellow, Obatala/Orishala “south” white, Shango “west” black. Not only the king’s regalia had meaning but so did the town that to Yoruba people lived in did too. Yoruba historically lived in large cities with populations in some reaching the hundreds of thousands. The towns had portal which were in the center and at night they would closed the opening with heavy doors every night. The Yoruba city was encircled by a protective barrier. Tall cone shaped entry turrets capped with a thick thatch of palm leaves historically framed the palace entry these visually complementing both the royal crowns and umbrellas.
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