Anorexia Nervosa & Bulimia Nervosa

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  • Topic: Bulimia nervosa, Anorexia nervosa, Eating disorders
  • Pages : 9 (2970 words )
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  • Published : April 28, 2011
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Running head: EATING DISORDERS
Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa
Table of Contents
I. Eating Disorders : Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa 1. Title page…………………………………………………..1 2. Table of contents…………………………………………..2 3. Text…………..…………………………………………….3-11 4. Conclusion………………………………………………….12 5. References………………………………………………………13 a. Introduction

b. Discussion
c. Conclusion
d. References

In an effort to achieve social acceptance in our Western culture, boys and girls are being pressured to conform to perceived notions about what constitutes a “good” physical appearance (Ruggiero 2008, p. 7). Unlike girls and women, males with eating disorders are less likely to be identified, as they are less likely to admit to having a problem or to get help.

In a 2006, Harvard University study of approximately three thousand American adults, researchers found that 25 percent of adults with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa were men and 40 percent with a binge-eating problem were men (Ruggiero 2008, p.7).

The reluctance of men seeking help in dealing with their disorder is due to them being seen as unmanly or homosexual (Ruggiero 2008, p. 8). Therapists and recovery centers are generally trained to treat and to talk with women about their eating disorder issues, not with men. Even the language used in screening tests is gender-biased. There are few eating disorder clinics in the United States that have specific programs for men. Some clinics don’t even accept male patients.

Experts agree that getting the anorexic or bulimic child or teen immediate help is the most important action a parent can take (Ruggiero 2008, p. 8). Medical professionals may not be as perceptive when it comes to diagnosing a young man’s eating disorder like they would a young female’s, so parents are under great pressure to be vigilant with regard to their child’s eating habits. School coaches have a responsibility to their young male athletes to discuss the issue of eating disorders, and to monitor those athletes’ exercise and eating habits (p. 8-9).

Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are now common in several industrialized cultures due to the influence of Western culture emphasizing thinness as the ideal body image. They are both serious and potentially fatal disorders. Convincing all young men and women to overcome these powerful messages from the media is not an easy task.

Recovery programs are mostly tailored for females, however, they also need to be customized for male patients. Some experts believe that males in recovery do best when they have their own group and body image sessions (Ruggiero 2008, p. 9).

Success in treating bulimia is greater than that of anorexia but both can be treated successfully. Bulimic patients respond well to cognitive behavioral therapy and antidepressant drugs (Gowers and Bryant-Waugh, 2004), while anorexic patients are screened for any medical problems, then are put through a series of behavior modification programs to bring their eating disorder under control in order to help them gain weight (Patel, Pratt and Greydarms, 2003). They are then possibly treated with psychotherapy to learn to understand and cope with their problems (Jaffa and McDermott, 2007).

Jacobs Brumberg says that during the 1960s there was an increase in the number of anorexia nervosa cases. There was no sophisticated method of collecting and interpreting data so the dimensions of the increase were hard to determine (Jacobs Brumberg 2000, p. 14). Over the past 30 years evidence suggests that there has been an absolute increase in the amount of anorexia nervosa. For example, twenty years ago the University of Wisconsin Hospital admitted one (1) anorexic per year, but in 1982 more than seventy (70) cases were admitted to the same institution (p. 15). Anorexia nervosa is still an infrequent disease in terms of the general population: Jacobs Brumberg says, “The annual incidence of this...
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