Animals Have Rights Too

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Research Essay Outline

I. Introduction

A. Definition of animal rights-the belief that non-human animals have interests and rights similar to humans and deserve the same respect

B. Background information on the issue

C. The discussion of animal rights and whether or not animals deserve the same rights as humans has been prevalent in society since the early 1800s, but animals do reserve the same rights to a life free from the terror of being hunted and the pain of abuse and experimentation; therefore, the solution is to create more laws in favor of animals’ rights and to prosecute those who choose to ignore these laws.

II. History
A. Research says each side tries to goad the other in an effort to undermine them B. Research says the side for animal rights has been fighting for their cause since the 19th century C. Opposition

III. Addressing the Issue
A. Research says animal rights activists have a valid point

B. Research says animal rights are not always enough

C. Opposition

IV. Animal Rights vs. Human Rights & Facts
A. Research says animals have enough mental and emotional faculties to deserve the same rights as humans B. Research says the effort to preserve animal lives has been by and large very successful. C. Opposition

V. Conclusion
A. Animals deserve the right to live their lives free from hunting, abuse and experimentation

B. Solution-stricter laws and harsher punishments

Animal Rights are defined as the belief that non-human animals have interests and rights similar to humans and deserve the same respect. Activists and activist groups such as PETA and the ASPCA have been fighting for the equal treatment of animals since the early 19th century and continue to do so in the present day. There are two sides to every argument and there are people who do not believe that animals deserve the same rights and liberties as humans. The discussion of animal rights and whether or not animals do deserve the same rights as humans has been prevalent in society since the early 1800s, but animals do deserve the same rights to a life free from the terror of being hunted and the pain of abuse and experimentation. Therefore, the solution is to create more laws in favor of animals’ rights and to prosecute those who choose to ignore these laws. To understand the debate over animals’ rights, one must know the history of the argument. First and foremost, animal rights were officially recognized in the U.S. in 1822. Richard Martin sponsored the passage of the Ill Treatment of Cattle Act in 1822 and drafted a Bill to prevent the Cruel and Improper Treatment of Dogs in 1826. Richard Martin was a skilled hunter, but he still believed animals had certain inalienable rights. There are two prominent activist groups that have been making headlines since their creation: the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), founded in 1866, and People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), founded in 1980. M. Lee and C. Ames Cushman say, “Organizations such as PETA have compared the suffering caused by the meat industry with the Holocaust, slavery, and domestic violence” and while this is an extreme declaration, it does get their point of view across. On the opposing side Alex Rich says that, “according to the FBI, animal rights activists have claimed responsibility in damages conservatively estimated at approximately $110 million.” One thing is certain about the animal rights movement, “it’s unique in that it is the only social movement in which the ostensibly oppressed party is not the party directly campaigning for an end to its oppression” because animals cannot speak for themselves so their only voice is the voice of their human counter partners (Rich). Another factor remains true throughout the history of the animal rights debate; Alex K. Rich says it best, “As is...
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