Analysis of the Wedding Gig

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The extract under the discussion is written by Stephen King – American novelist and short-story writer, whose enormously popular books revived the interest in horror fiction from the 1970s. King's place in the modern horror fiction can be compared to that of J.R.R. Tolkien's who created the modern genre of fantasy. Like Anthony Trollope, Charles Dickens or Balzac in his La Comedie humaine, King has expressed the fundamental concerns of his era, and used the horror genre as his own branch of artistic expression. King has underlined, that even in the world of cynicism, despair, and cruelties, it remains possible for individuals to find love and discover unexpected resources in themselves. His characters often conquer their own problems and malevolent powers that would suppress or destroy them. King was the 2003 recipient of The National Book Foundation's Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. King evinces a thorough knowledge of the horror genre, as shown in his nonfiction book "Danse Macabre", which chronicles several decades of notable works in both literature and cinema. He also writes stories outside the horror genre, including the novellas "The Body" and "Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption" (adapted as the movies "Stand By Me" and "The Shawshank Redemption", respectively), as well as "The Green Mile", "The Eyes of the Dragon", and "Hearts in Atlantis". In the past, Stephen King has written under the pen names Richard Bachman and once John Swithen. King often begins a story with no idea how the story will end. He believes strongly that his best writing comes from freewriting, with no definite end at the beginning of a new work. He is known for his great eye for detail, for continuity, and for inside references; many stories that may seem unrelated are often linked by secondary characters, fictional towns, or off-hand references to events in previous books. Read as a whole, King's work (which is centered around his Dark Tower series)...
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