Analysis of Albert Ellis's Life Experiences and Psychological Philosophies

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Analysis of Albert Ellis's Life Experiences and Psychological Philosophies Life, Education, and Experiences
Famed American psychologist Albert Ellis (1913-2007) was born in Pittsburgh and raised in New York City (DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Sheehy 1997). Albert reportedly had a somewhat troubled childhood, but overcame his troubles by becoming a "stubborn and pronounced problem solver" (DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Sheehy 1997). As a young child Albert became afflicted with a serious kidney disorder (DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Sheehy 1997). At the age of 12 his parents divorced (DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Sheehy 1997). These two life-altering events were, in part, what led him to begin focusing his mind on understanding people (DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Sheehy 1997). In junior high Albert Ellis dreamed of becoming a great novelist (DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Sheehy 1997) but by the time he reached college age, he decided it might be more practical to become an accountant instead. However, he planned to retire by the age of 30 so that he could then take up writing at his own leisure (DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Sheehy 1997). Due in part to the Great Depression, his goals changed but he did go on to graduate college in 1934 with a degree in business (DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Sheehy 1997). After graduation he and his brother became entrepreneurs and started their own business. They sold pants purchased from the garment district (DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Sheehy 1997). In 1938 a gift and novelty firm employed him as their personal manager (DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Sheehy 1997). Albert Ellis spent his free time writing short stories, plays, novels, and nonfiction books, but, much to his disappointment, was never able to get them published. (DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Sheehy 1997) Thereafter, he began working on what he called "sex-family revolution” (DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Sheehy 1997). Albert wrote a paper entitled "The Case for Sexual Liberty," and went on to become an expert on the subject of sex, love, and marital issues (DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Sheehy 1997). In 1943 he earned a master's degree in clinical psychology from Teachers College (DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Ellis 1997). Subsequently, he opened a part-time private practice in New York while working on his PhD (DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Ellis 1997)_._ Ellis received his PhD in 1947 from the same place he received his master's degree, Teachers College (DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Ellis 1997). After graduating and obtaining his PhD; Albert Ellis published many papers and several books (DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Ellis 1997). Some of his most controversial writings, from the 1940s and 1950s, include The H_omosexual in America_ (1951), The Folklore of Sex (1951), and Sex Without Guilt (1958_) _(DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Ellis 1997). Some of his controversial articles included The Influence of Heterosexual Cultures on the Attitudes of Homosexuals (1951) and Prostitution Re-assessed (1951) both of these articles were written for the International Journal of Sexology (DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Ellis 2004). Albert Ellis' writings were groundbreaking material that opened the door to the sexual revolution of the 1960s and the gay and lesbian rights movement in the 1970's (Ellis 1992). These writings were controversial at that time and may have stigmatized or put a negative label on Albert Ellis. However, these writings as well as references from his friends was how he formed his client base (DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Ellis 2004). Most of Albert Ellis' early clients were individuals and couples suffering from sex, love and marital problems (DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Ellis 2004). Albert Ellis also grew his private practice through publicity from his talks, workshops, radio, and television presentations which led to referrals from a number of psychologists with whom he had...
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