American History. Rosalind Franklin Treated Unfairly

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Rosalind Franklin Treated Unfairly

Francis Crick & James D. Watson

Franklin was beaten to publication Of DNA structure by Crick and Watson

Crick & Watson were awarded the nobel prize in Physiology or medicine in 1962

Behind the story of Watson & Crick unfairness towards Rosalind Franklin.

Early Years

Rosalind Elsie Franklin was born on July, 25, 1920. She grew up in Notting Hill London. Rosalind was the fifth child out of four in her family. Along with Rosalind parents Ellis Aurthur Franklin a Merchant Banker and her mother Murie Frances Waley. While growing up Franklin showed nothing more but her scholastic abilities especially at St Paul’s Girls School where she succeed in science Latin and sports.

The Two Men who benefited from her work without giving her credit.

Controversy

Franklin fought an uphill battle as a scientist.Her partner Maurice Wilkins treated her as an assistant instead of his equal partner. Regardless, she continued her research of DNA. Franklin photograph DNA using X-Rays. Wilkins found Franklin picture and showed it to Watson. From the picture, Watson was able to figure out the DNA molecule structure. He then published the results in a scienific journal. As a result, Watson & Crick received credit for discovering the DNA molecule,even though their discovery was based on Franklin private photo. In 1962 Watson and Crick were awarded the Noble Prize but Franklin was not.

Caption describing picture or graphic.

Her Death and Legacy

In 1956 Franklin discover that she had two cancerous tumors in her abdomen. Rosalind Franklin underwent two years of treatment, but tragically died from it on April 16 1958.

Franklin work with DNA lead to the ultimate discovery of the DNA structure and forever change the way we now understand the make up of the human body. Even though Franklin did not receive recognition during her life time, she is widely accepted as a...
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