Alternatives to Passwords

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3. Alternatives
Logging in using user names and passwords are by far the most common way to access modern computer systems. However as we have seen these old methods of user authentication are susceptible to social engineering and new social networks have made this all the more easier. Luckily there are a few alternatives. These include Imaging, security combinations and Biometrics. 3.1 Images

One possible solution to combat many of these problems would be to use images. Using a Deja Vu graphical scheme could strengthen security while keeping the convenience of more traditional methods. This method works with recognition instead of recall which as explained before humans are much better at, for example when you first meet someone you might forget there name a week from now, but there face will stick with you for much longer.

The idea is that a user sets up a image portfolio. The types of images the user can select from deeply influences the security of the system, for this reason abstract or random art is used. It was found that if the user could select from a selection of photo’s some photos were selected more than others such as the golden gate bridge which in a study conducted by Usenix nine out of twenty participants selected the golden gate bridge from 100 photos to put in there portfolio. On the other hand using random art the selection of pieces showed no strong patterns that would lead to security vulnerabilities.

With so much info available on the internet and the constant threat of social engineering your password or recovery question usually if not always relate to you somehow. Using abstract and random art not only forces your login to not relate to your personal self and likings, but it also decreases the chances of you needing to use any password recovery functions.

PIN Password Art Photo
Failed Logins 5% (1) 5% (1) 0 0
Failed Logins (after one week) 35%(7) 30% (6) 10%(2) 5% (1) Table 2: % Failed logins (# failed logins/20...
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