Alien Invasion

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2012 ALIEN INVASION?

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Researcher Ian O'Neill said that it’s ridiculous 2012 doomsday theories can get. He also said that according to the Examiner.com (a rather dubious, yet expansive news website), 2012 could be filled with an alien invasion fleet after "3 very large, very fast moving objects" were spotted in some astronomical images.

But there's a problem. The "UFO Examiner" reporting this nonsense appears to have made the whole thing up, using a fictitious astrophysicist as a source, a dodgy astronomical photograph and a whole truckload of delusional imagination to communicate the fantasy.

Researcher said that it’s his first real attempt for some time that he had seen someone trying to indicate there will be an alien invasion in 2012. It's been done before, but the invading aliens involving Zecharia Sitchin's comical "Annunaki" -- are supposed to be traveling aboard a fictional planet called Nibiru (set to arrive on Dec. 21, 2012, of course).

Armageddon Planet or Astronomical Baloney?

Bad Astronomer Phil Plait clearly points out; the flimsy piece of evidence being used by the "UFO Examiner" is actually an image defect on the observation plate. It also happens a lot! What makes this particular example (the picture on the top) susceptible to image defects is that the original image was captured on a physical photographic plate and then scanned and digitized (i.e., copied onto a computer for easy access) through the 2nd Generation Digitized Sky Survey. During the scanning process according to Phil Plait, it is nigh-on impossible to remove all dust and other debris from the plates, so dust and other debris can often be found floating in some digitized images. Also, chips and cracks in the emulsion of the plates will be scanned. But how do you know if what you're looking at is a chip, scratch or coffee stain and not a ginormous alien space ship flying toward Earth? Apart from the simple application of logical thought, astronomers will often photograph the same part of the night sky with several different filters. If the object is in the blue filter, say (as the above photo was lifted from), and not in the red filter, then it is highly likely that the object isn't real and it's just a fleck of dirt on one of the plates.

CONCLUSION:

HonestIy I really don’t believe in aliens. We might be scraping the bottom of the barrel, come on, aliens? Giant spaceships? Different colored people? Alien invasion in 2012?! I think the explanation above is enough to make us believe that “alien invasion” is not true. Anyone who wrote about that alien thing is just aiming to earn. They aren't publicizing the end of the world as some helpful public service announcement, obviously we really know that, they're doing it to make money. The writers or researchers who would say that they aren't doing it for money are doing it because they have a dubious grasp on reality.

2012 Phenomenon

Myths of the Near Future?

The release of the new Roland Emmerich Hollywood blockbuster ‘2012’ has brought fresh fervour to Internet geeks and astrological scholars alike, both of whom might have a keen interest in the prophesies events of December 21, 2012, although most likely for different reasons. The end of the world predictions for 2012 according to some researchers, stem from the belief that at the conclusion of the 5,125 year-long Mayan long count calendar, which coincides with December 21, 2012 in our Gregorian calendar, there will be some sort of earth-shattering event or a series of events that will bring about the destruction of mankind.

The modern day interest in all this can be traced back to the late 1950s when Maud Worcester Makemson, an archaeoastronomer (someone that studies ancient astronomy and its sociological implications) noted that the end of this time cycle would have had great significance for the ancient Maya people. This idea was further developed by an...
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