Alaska Oil Drilling

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  • Topic: Petroleum, Nature, Arctic Refuge drilling controversy
  • Pages : 4 (1312 words )
  • Download(s) : 57
  • Published : March 18, 2013
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TOPIC: 1. Find an example (not in the course readings) where the interests of humans and the environment are in conflict (recall the Monarch butterfly reserves in Mexico). What would your judgment be in resolving this conflict? Explain your decision.Are there possibilities for negotiation or compromise?

Word count: 1056 words

In the era of capitalism and fierce corporate rivalries, the agenda for any major corporation is likely to prioritize profits over social problems such as environmental degradation. An example that sheds light on the conflict between human interests and environmental responsibility is the controversial approval of the oil drilling in the Northern Slope region of Alaska and the drilling that has already began, in the Tar Sands of Alberta. In this paper I will firstly explain the situation regarding why the drilling for oil is up for debate to take place. Secondly I will assess the benefits and the irreparable damage that could possibly bring forth devastating effects towards the eco-system and the wildlife in the area. Finally I will make a personal recommendation on how I feel the situation should be brought to a close using logic and reason towards both our human entailed interests and the natural world. It is important to determine whether the benefits of drilling outweigh the cost and unrectifiable damage that the environment will undergo. The dividing line between rational decisions, which benefit us not only in terms of capital and gain but also in ensuring a flourishing future for our surroundings, should be well drawn and highly regarded. For these reasons, this paper will prove that the drilling should not be approved, as the grave consequences of this project are not outweighed by its benefits. The drilling is to take place in Alaska’s North Slope region, home to the Arctic National Wildlife refuge and the Naval Petroleum reserve. The ANWR is a 19,049,236-acre piece of land protected since 1960 (burger). In the...
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