Airline Database Management

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  • Topic: Airline, Aircraft, International Civil Aviation Organization
  • Pages : 9 (1968 words )
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  • Published : February 4, 2013
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AIRLINE MANAGEMENT DATABASE CONCEPTUAL DESIGN

Course: Database Systems
Course ID: CSCI-760
Instructor: Dr Adly Elzoheary
Student: Jagmit Singh School ID: 0653535
Table of contents:
1) Airline Industry at a Glance
2) Arms and Legs of an airline industry
3) Project requirements
4) Business Rules and Function Rules
5) UML diagram
6) Database dependency diagram (DDD)
7) Snapshots of tables created
8) Script for table creation
9) Script for database testing

* Airline Industry:
* An airline provides air transport services for passengers or freight, generally with a recognized operating certificate or license. Airlines lease or own their aircraft with which to supply these services and may form partnerships or alliances with other airlines for mutual benefit. * Airlines vary from those with a single aircraft carrying mail or cargo, through full-service international airlines operating hundreds of aircraft. Airline services can be categorized as being intercontinental, intra continental, domestic, or international and may be operated as scheduled services or charters. * Full-service airlines have a high level of fixed and operating costs in order to establish and maintain air services: labor, fuel, airplanes, engines, spares and parts, IT services and networks, airport equipment, airport handling services, sales distribution, catering, training, aviation insurance and other costs. Thus all but a small percentage of the income from ticket sales is paid out to a wide variety of external providers or internal cost centers. * Groups such as the International Civil Aviation Organization establish worldwide standards for safety and other vital concerns. Most international air traffic is regulated by bilateral agreements between countries, which designate specific carriers to operate on specific routes. The model of such an agreement was the Bermuda Agreement between the US and UK following World War II, which designated airports to be used for transatlantic flights and gave each government the authority to nominate carriers to operate routes. * Bilateral agreements are based on the "freedoms of the air," a group of generalized traffic rights ranging from the freedom to overfly a country to the freedom to provide domestic flights within a country (a very rarely granted right known as cabotage). Most agreements permit airlines to fly from their home country to designated airports in the other country: some also extend the freedom to provide continuing service to a third country, or to another destination in the other country while carrying passengers from overseas. * In the 1990s, "open skies" agreements became more common. These agreements take many of these regulatory powers from state governments and open up international routes to further competition. Open skies agreements have met some criticism, particularly within the European Union, whose airlines would be at a comparative disadvantage with the United States' because of cabotage restrictions. * The International Air Transport Association (IATA) is an international industry trade group of airlines headquartered in Montreal, Quebec,Canada, where the International Civil Aviation Organization is also headquartered. IATA's mission is to represent, lead, and serve the airline industry. IATA represents some 230 airlines comprising 93% of scheduled international air traffic. The Director General and Chief Executive Officer is Giovanni Bisignani. Currently, IATA is present in over 150 countries covered through 101 offices around the globe. IATA’s stated mission is to represent, lead and serve the airline industry. All the Airline rules and regulations are defined by IATA. The main aim of IATA is to provide safe and secure transportation to its passengers.

* Arms and legs of an Airline Industry:
A. Customers
B. Management...
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