Aged Care Essay 3

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This essay aims to represent an argument between two view points: to remain in their own homes with ongoing support from families and the health system or going to residential aged care of elderly in Australia. Especially, it deals with the issue of increasing ageing population in Australia includes statistical information highlighting some causes and telltales. The context presented is economic and social. It also looks at the effects that increasing of the ageing population has on society, the individual and the Australian economy.

Australia is one of the most advantaged aged care systems in the world. The increasing numbers of ageing population is one of the major transformations being experienced by Australia’s population, and is the current focus for both economic and social policy. In June 2007 there were 2.75 million people over 64 in Australia, of whom 334,900 were aged over 84. Some 160,000 elderly Australians occupy beds in residential aged care although a large number, a relatively small proportion of the elderly. (Hogan, 2008). Furthermore, the view by the Australian Bureau of Statistics that in the five years to June 2008, the number of people aged 65 years and over increased by 300,000 (or 11.8%) to reach 2.8 million. The proportion of the population in this age group also increased, rising from 12.7% to 13.2%. In the 12 months to 30 June 2008, the number of people aged 85 years and over increased by 20,700 people (6.0%) to reach 364,900. (ABS, 2008). Even though there has been an increasing of the ageing population in recent years, the aged people have been ensured access to available care services appropriate to their assessed needs, and to the support of carers in their caring role services to receive benefits and support from families and the health system such as Community Health Services (HACC) and Aged Care Assessment Team. According to the Campaign for Care of Older Australians (CCOA) in TheNational Report of Aged and Community Services in Australia (ACSA), ACSA CEO, Greg Mundy said it was important to recognise the enormity of the task the Government faces in reforming health services, but added that aged care must be an integral consideration. While the nation’s hospital systems treat large numbers of people every day, aged care providers support and care for more than 1 million people in their own homes and more than 200,000 in residential facilities. A single level of government, the Federal Government, responsible for proper funding and regulation of aged care, would advance the delivery of services when and where they are needed. (The National Report, 2010). It's the very least we deserve. According to a study by University of Adelaide psychologist Dr Linley Denson, most retired people do not plan ahead when it comes to aged care for their later years (Denson, 2006); it depends on their situation, health and back grounds. Daily life however, is often a challenge for individuals with age induced problems such as motor, vision, and auditory disabilities and have to cognitive disabilities such as Alzheimer’s disease, dementia. The elderly have to decide their life styles after retirements due to varying illnesses, disabilities and personality traits, it is almost impossible to design for each individual’s unique, needs. The older person who has stayed at home for as long as possible with help of community services such as home help and district nursing is quite likely to bypass independent living and move straight into hostel or nursing home care. For example, an older person may decide to move into a retirement village because he/she enjoys the security its offers in an environment shared with people who have similar needs and lifestyles. Or the older person may apply for hostel accommodation for those reasons as well as an increasing need for personal care. On the other hand, for many people, living in the comfort of their own home is an important...
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