After Apple Picking and Road Not Taken Comparative Essay

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Even in the earlier days of Robert Frost’s long arduous active life, he looked upon the journey of life in a more seiner way. Where most of the younger crowd may prefer a “happy go lucky” approach to life, Frost invested his every adapting yet inspiring mind into mysteries and the choices we come across in life, the issues of mortality and morals, and one’s view of death are explored in such a way, one may find it difficult but to be inspired by his work.

“After Apple Picking” and “The road Not Taken” at first appear to be worryingly similar to each other. Not only they were crafted by the same poet at approximately the same time, but the actual content dig into similar ground as in the two of them, they mostly drenched into the past rather than the present and future. However, “After Apple-Picking” is told through the voice of a tired, weary-some aged man coming to the realization that he hans’t got much left to give and is looking forward to greeting death like an old friend. “The Road Not Taken” is also being told by an older man, only he has aged better and is daydreaming about past choices, and that has made all the difference.

The poem “After Apple Picking” immediately begins with a metaphor that describes ladders pointing up “Towards heaven.” This is the line that perfectly introduces the poem. Being told from the eyes of an old man, he tells us that the sent of apples is the “Essence of winter sleep is on the night.” If one was to look into the metaphoric language of seasons, one may find that the season of the cold may refer to the end of one’s life. So to refer to the occupation this unfortunate man has endured, “sleep,” it is clear that his active days are coming to a close. This strong, message is repeated throughout the text. The water that froze with contact with the, “pane of glass,” the “hoary grass,” are more metaphors to the end of one’s journey.

Later on through the poem, a confusing array of vague words and phrases suggest that the...
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