Abc Case Study Got Milk

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Got Milk-Case Study
SUMMARY: -
“GOT MILK” – necessity is the mother of invention
This campaign; one of the most popular campaign of 1990s was borne out of one such necessity which changed the world of advertising with its innovative approach. It established how a brand can be resurrected with a creative branding strategy. In order to revive the declining sales of milk this campaign was started for California Milk Processor Board and was carried out by Goodby, Silverstein and partners. The powerful ad campaign was started in 1993. It superbly understood the minds of consumers and characteristically identified and targeted them. Recognising that taste and health are the two benefits which people looked for it started the campaign accordingly. They applied the deprivation strategy by partnering with the other food products whose consumption cannot be imagined by the American population without milk. This worked quite well and milk consumption increased. They targeted the consumers with a 360 degree approach and advertisements in prints and Media complemented each other. Earlier the taste and milk as a accompany to the other food products was used as a promotion point. But later recognising that parents and women also give a lot of importance to the health benefits simultaneous campaign highlighting these benefits was also aired. Later they also targeted the Hispanic population. This change in strategy from time to time according to needs of time made this a strategy which was exemplary. A number of ad campaigns were targeted on same lines after its success. Now the future will present them with new challenges like should CMPB keep on doing what it has been doing or should it focus on newer channels and customers to sustain the success of campaign.

Q1. Analysis of Brand Culture
The California Milk Processor Board (CMPB) launched its legendary “got milk?” advertisement campaign in the year 1993 as a part of its promotional strategy to revitalize the declining sales of milk. Prior to launching this campaign, CMPB had launched several other campaigns that stressed on the health benefits of milk and milk products. However, the plummeting sales figures prompted CMPB to further analyze the situation which divulged that although milk was a popular commodity that was consumed by many, it seldom occupied the consumer’s mind share in the wake of a multitude of alternate beverage. Two other interesting factors that this analysis revealed were that in the consumer’s mind milk was primarily for the family’s consumption and they rationed and shared the drink and secondly, most people ignored the health benefits when it came to deciding upon a choice of beverage. Secondly, consumers across different age-groups asserted that milk is a accompanying beverage with a variety of food items like cereals, cookies and sandwiches. Another interesting revelation was the high demand for milk among the Latino community, who accounted for a sizable part of California’s populace. Having conducted a thorough research, CMPB decided to change the nature of the relationship that consumers shared with their milk and launched the “got-milk?” campaign that was not only an instant success; it also accounted for a rise in the sale of milk. The campaign was targeted at 70% of California’s market who were also regular milk drinkers and attempts were made to make the user view the advertisements at home during the times of milk consumption, at the store and on the way to the stores. The campaign was based on a “milk deprivation” strategy that tried to make the consumers realize how difficult it was to not have any milk to wash down cereals, cookies or sandwiches. Five years later, CMPB once again introduced the health aspect to the “got-milk?” advertisement fearing the eventual death of the campaign. This campaign was a huge success as it tried to forge a new relationship by identifying milk as a domestic consumption product. The organization left no stones...
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