2.2 Safeguarding the Welfare of Children and Young People

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TDA 2.2

Task 1

List the legislation, guidelines and policies for safeguarding the welfare of children and young people including safety

• The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child 1989 – The UNCRC was put into place in 189 and ratified by the UK in 1991. This includes 54 articles. • The Education Act 2002 – These acts are updated with each corresponding year. • Children Act 2004 and 2006 – The 2004 act came along the Every Child Matters Act and had a huge impact in the way which schools address issues or care, welfare and discipline. There are 5 main outcomes for children/young people under Every Child Matters which are; Be healthy, stay safe, Enjoy and achieve, Make a positive contribution, Achieve economic well being • The Freedom of Information Act – This act was brought into place in 2005 to promote transparency and accountability in the public sector and is fully retrospective. • The Human Rights Act 1998 - ‘It is unlawful for a public authority to act in a way which is incompatible with a convention right’. • The Special Education Needs (SEN) Code of Practice 2001 and the Disability Discrimination Act 1995/2005 – Under this practice parents and SEN children have had increased rights to mainstream education and also children who have special educational needs are been included more into mainstream schools and the individual support assistants who work along side them. • The Data Protection Act 1998 – This Act means that the school can only use and keep information for the purpose which it was intended and only people who are authorised to have it may see it.

Describe the roles of the different agencies involved in safeguarding

There are many agencies available in which are involved with safeguarding;

• Social Services:  Are there to offer support to both the child and the setting. Social services have the powers to investigate any suspected improper behavior from carers, children or the setting. • Child Protection Investigation Unit (CPIU): This unit is run by the police who have the powers to investigate, interview and arrest anyone suspected of abusing a child. • Health Visitors: A Health Visitor can sometimes be the first person to spot abuse, especially physical. Health Visitors have a duty of care to refer such information to Social Services. • School Nurse: A School Nurse can sometimes be the first person to spot abuse, especially physical. School Nurse has a duty of care to refer such information to Social Services. • The Police: The Police have the powers to investigate, interview and arrest anyone suspected of abusing a child. Quite often they will ask the CPIU to investigate directly and also inform Social Services. • NSPCC: Information can be passed anonymously to the NSPCC. If taken seriously the NSPCC have a duty of care to refer such information to Social Services. • OFSTED: If there are questions about practices within the setting then OFSTED may be asked to investigate further. • Health Professionals- GP’s, nurses, midwives and doctors in emergency departments may examine children with injuries which they may expect to be non- accidental. They have a duty to alert social services

Identify the characteristics of different types of child abuse Physical
• Unexplained marks on the body, e.g. burns, scalds, bruises, fractures • Bite marks
• Abrasions/bruising around the mouth
• Marks on the body showing implements
• Substance miss-use
• Strange excuses
• Shown through role-play/drawings
• Soling themselves
• Self harm
• Eating disorders
• Panic of been left in the care of a certain person or certain sex • Running away from home
• Not wanting to get changed for PE
• Withdrawn/aggressive behavior
Emotional Abuse
• Speech disorders
• Delay in physical or emotional development
• Poor concentration
•...
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