1.Shopping and Tourist Night Markets in Taiwan

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ARTICLE IN PRESS

Tourism Management 27 (2006) 138–145 www.elsevier.com/locate/tourman

Shopping and Tourist Night Markets in Taiwan
An-Tien Hsieha, Janet Changb,Ã
b

School of Management, Da-Yeh University, Chang-hua, Taiwan Department and Graduate School of Tourism Management, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan Received 29 January 2004; accepted 28 June 2004

a

Abstract From theoretical viewpoints, analyses of consumer motivation have been applied to the shopping and the tourism industry for decades. However, little research has been done on night markets or street vendors. According to the Statistical Information of Taiwan Tourism Bureau (2002 annual survey report on R.O.C. inbound travelers, Taipei, Tourism Bureau, 2003), Tourist Night Markets ranked among the top three most popular sight-seeing spots for tourists spending their leisure time in Taiwan. The objectives of this study are to understand tourists’ motivations and their preferred leisure activities when they shop in Tourist Night Markets. With respect to the research methodology, this study employs an exploratory research style and adopts a convenience sampling method. The unit of analysis is the Hong Kong Chinese visitor. According to the research results, novelty-seeking, exercising and experiencing local culture and customs are the major factors that motivate tourists to shop in Tourist Night Markets. The results are: eating out overwhelmingly dominated the leisure activities (88.5%), followed by everyday shopping (56%), and novelty-seeking (32%). Existing problems in Taiwan Tourist Night Markets perceived by Hong Kong visitors are theft, parking and traffic issues. Suggestions for relevant governmental and city authorities are provided and research implications and limitations are also addressed. r 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Shopping; Tourist Night Markets; Novelty-seeking

1. Introduction A night market is a venue for local people to eat out, to shop and so forth. It is a conglomeration of native culture and, applying Urry’s well-known viewpoint on the tourists’ gaze, street vendors perhaps become an appealing tourist attraction. Cohen (1972) pointed out that the concept of novelty plays a central role in shaping the tourist experience. Thus, it is claimed that tourists are conscious of something ‘‘beyond’’, something ‘‘hidden’’, within their tourist experience, such as the inner workings of the back-stage production (MacCannell, 1973). ÃCorresponding author. Tel.: +886 937 402 966.

E-mail addresses: j_chang@ms63.url.com.tw, jc_chang@faculty.pccu.edu.tw (J. Chang). 0261-5177/$ - see front matter r 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.tourman.2004.06.017

By uncovering novelty and ‘‘something hidden’’, the tourist experience is rendered ‘‘authentic’’ (Hughes, 1995; Cary, 2004). Tourists are made to feel that they are mingling in the local community (Ooi, 2002). Bloom (2002a, b) believed that shopping in Taiwan is the most effective way to experience an authentic lifestyle of the local society. According to the Tourism Bureau’s statistical data, shopping in Tourist Night Markets has become one of the most popular tourism attractions in Taiwan. According to this source, diversity, on-site business activities and friendly atmosphere are the main factors luring tourists to indulge themselves in food, playing games, shopping, and experiencing the authenticity of the native customs and culture. Consequently, this kind of venue provides leisure and entertainment and is thus recognized as a tourism attraction.

ARTICLE IN PRESS
A.-T. Hsieh, J. Chang / Tourism Management 27 (2006) 138–145 139

1.1. Profile of Tourist Night Markets Night markets have existed in Taiwan for decades; Tourist Night Markets, in particular, were established in 1987. There are three formally enacted Tourist Night Markets in Taipei City: Hwa-shee, Zhao-ho and Linchiang Tourist Night Markets. Wang (1999), an officer of...
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